Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of ancient Ausonia or the Ausonians
  • adjective poetic Italian
  • noun An ancient inhabitant of middle or lower Italy
  • noun poetic An Italian

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For it proclaimed that they should not escape the paths of an endless sea nor grievous tempests, unless Circe should purge away the guilt of the ruthless murder of Apsyrtus; and it bade Polydeuces and Castor pray to the immortal gods first to grant a path through the Ausonian sea where they should find Circe, daughter of Perse and Helios.

    The Argonautica

  • And let them not fall in their helplessness into Charybdis lest she swallow them at one gulp, or approach the hideous lair of Scylla, Ausonian

    The Argonautica

  • Around many a one lies dead, aged Galaesus among them, slain as he throws himself between them for a peacemaker, once incomparable in justice and wealth of Ausonian fields; for him five flocks bleated, a five-fold herd returned from pasture, and an hundred ploughs upturned the soil.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • For you there is rest in store, and no ocean floor to furrow, no ever-retreating Ausonian fields to pursue.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Phoenician eyes are stayed on Carthage towers and thy Libyan city, what wrong is it, I pray, that we Trojans find our rest on Ausonian land?

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • First must the Trinacrian wave clog thine oar, and thy ships traverse the salt Ausonian plain, by the infernal pools and Aeaean Circe's isle, ere thou mayest build thy city in safety on a peaceful land.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • [640-673] Ausonian ranks and town, and thus addresses triumphant Iülus:

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Himself, when he saw the pillowed head and fair face of Pallas, and on his smooth breast the gaping wound of the Ausonian spear-head, speaks thus with welling tears:

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Thou wert not to share the search for Italian borders and destined fields, nor the dim Ausonian Tiber. '

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Nay, but when, their duty done, they shall lie at last in their Ausonian haven, from all that have outgone the waves and borne their Dardanian captain to the fields of Laurentum, will I take their mortal body, and bid them be goddesses of the mighty deep, even as Doto the Nereïd and Galatea, when they cut the sea that falls away from their breasts in foam. '

    The Aeneid of Virgil

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.