Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Sounds like an amazing book to read and well Avarice is Greed.

    [REVIEW] Jackie Kessler’s HELL’S BELLES « Urban Fantasy Land

  • The Truth about WMDs, Justice for American National Guard units and innocent Iraqi lives, and the Avarice is for her.

    Think Progress » Judy Miller

  • Avarice, which is not only infidelity, but idolatry, either from covetous progeny or questuary11 education, had no root in his breast, who made good works the expression of his faith, and was big with desires unto public and lasting charities; and surely where good wishes and charitable intentions exceed abilities, theorical beneficency may be more than

    Letter to a Friend

  • Avarice, which is never satisfied, induced Bernardo to believe that his son had other money, and he had him summoned before the city magistrates, to account for it.

    The Life and Legends of Saint Francis of Assisi

  • Avarice, which is never satisfied, induced Bernardo to believe that his son had other money, and he had him summoned before the city magistrates, to account for it.

    The Life and Legends of Saint Francis of Assisi

  • Avarice, which is not only infidelity but idolatry, either from covetous progeny or questuary education, had no root in his breast, who made good works the expression of his faith, and was big with desires unto public and lasting charities; and surely, where good wishes and charitable intentions exceed abilities, theorical beneficency may be more than a dream.

    Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern — Volume 6

  • The Desire of Wealth, commonly called Avarice; -- though avarice is perhaps justly to be regarded as the morbid excess or abuse of the propensity.

    The Philosophy of the Moral Feelings

  • Avarice, which is not only infidelity, but idolatry, either from covetous progeny or questuary [III. 11] education, had no root in his breast, who made good works the expression of his faith, and was big with desires unto public and lasting charities; and surely where good wishes and charitable intentions exceed abilities, theorical beneficency may be more than a dream.

    Religio Medici, Hydriotaphia, and the Letter to a Friend

  • In a letter to the Nation magazine, he criticizes John D. Rockefeller as a voracious trust-magnate; "Avarice" he writes, "is a sin of Christians; it is the ideal of individualist."

    The Fiction of Chesterton

  • On the one hand it is argued that it is not Avarice which is a vice, but extravagance, its opposite.

    On Human Nature

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