Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A 19th-century religious movement arising out of Shiism that asserted a new revelation and a new law, claiming to supersede Islamic law and demanding extensive social reforms. One of its followers founded the Baha'i faith in 1863.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A religious, political, and social system founded in Persia about 1843 by Seyd Mohammed Ali, a native of Shiraz, who pretended to be descended from Mohammed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The doctrine of a modern religious pantheistical sect in Persia, which was founded, about 1844, by Mirza Ali Mohammed ibn Rabhik (1820 -- 1850), who assumed the title of Bab-ed-Din (Per., Gate of the Faith). Babism is a mixture of Mohammedan, Christian, Jewish, and Parsi elements. This doctrine forbids concubinage and polygamy, and frees women from many of the degradations imposed upon them among the orthodox Mohammedans. Mendicancy, the use of intoxicating liquors and drugs, and slave dealing, are forbidden; asceticism is discountenanced.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The doctrine of a modern religious sect, which originated in Persia in 1844.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Bab (Persian باب bâb a gate), the title assumed by the founder, Siyyid `Alí Muhammad.

Examples

  • Weinberger writes, "Judaism occupies its own whole number (296) but Islam shares its number with two others, Babism and Baha'i (297)."

    Archive 2007-05-01

  • Weinberger writes, "Judaism occupies its own whole number (296) but Islam shares its number with two others, Babism and Baha'i (297)."

    Goodbye to Dewey?

  • It was founded in 1863 in Persia as an offshoot of an earlier sect called Babism.

    Baha'i

  • He soon grew used to the functions of the office, and gave out hundred-dollar interviews on every subject, from labour-strikes to Babism, with a frequency which reacted agreeably on the domestic exchequer.

    The Descent of Man

  • He soon grew used to the functions of the office, and gave out hundred-dollar interviews on every subject, from labour-strikes to Babism, with a frequency which reacted agreeably on the domestic exchequer.

    The Descent of Man

  • He soon grew used to the functions of the office, and gave out hundred-dollar interviews on every subject, from labour-strikes to Babism, with a frequency which reacted agreeably on the domestic exchequer.

    The Descent of Man and Other Stories

  • 'Babism,' article in _Encyclopaedia of Religions_.

    The Reconciliation of Races and Religions

  • Aḥmad (the forerunner of Babism), the Bāb himself and Baha'ullah

    The Reconciliation of Races and Religions

  • [2060] Babism is fairly well represented in Persia at the present day; see R.G. Browne.

    Introduction to the History of Religions Handbooks on the History of Religions, Volume IV

  • _Babism and Bahaism_, [2059] the transformation of Babism effected by Baháu'llah, is a church in all essential points, though its organization consists merely in the devotion of its adherents to the teaching and the person of its founder; it has no clergy, no religious ceremonial, no public prayers, no connection with any civil government, but its dogma is well-defined and it offers eternal salvation to its adherents.

    Introduction to the History of Religions Handbooks on the History of Religions, Volume IV

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