Boniface VIII

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • Pope (1294–1303) who struggled to assert authority over England, France, and Sicily.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun pope who declared that Catholic princes are subject to the pope in temporal as well as in theological matters (1235-1303)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When the contrast between Boniface VIII and Philip IV reached its most critical point, he continued to side staunchly with the pope.

    Giles of Rome

  • Benedict Caetani's election to the papal see marked a further radical change in his career, as Boniface VIII appointed him archbishop of Bourges in 1295.

    Giles of Rome

  • Pope Gregory IX left eleven rules and Boniface VIII eighty-eight for the true interpretation of the law.

    Clarification

  • No humans are so organized, so united in purpose, and so intelligent as to mastermind the de-Christianization of the world which has happened from the time Boniface VIII was slapped at Anagni until now.

    Christendom's Building Blocks — Catholic Communities

  • During the Middle Ages, King Philippe IV le Bel the Handsome, grandson of Saint Louis, had his envoy assault Pope Boniface VIII, who died as a result.

    Archive 2008-09-07

  • During the Middle Ages, King Philippe IV le Bel the Handsome, grandson of Saint Louis, had his envoy assault Pope Boniface VIII, who died as a result.

    The Pope in Paris: France and religion

  • They were valid in the times of Innocent III and Boniface VIII.

    The Reign of Christ the King

  • However, Boniface VIII, then 86 years of age, was deeply shattered by this attack on his own person and died a few weeks later.

    Think Progress » Congressman: ‘I Fear…We Will Have Many More Muslims In The United States’

  • During the conflict between Philip IV of France and Pope Boniface VIII in 1301, Giles of Rome wrote De Ecclesiastica Potestate, establishing the absolute secular superiority of the papacy. Giles 'master Boniface VIII was responsible for the two famous Bulls,

    John Wyclif's Political Philosophy

  • Adolpho of Saxony succeeded to the empire; and to the papacy, Pietro del Murrone, who took the name of Celestino; but, being a hermit and full of sanctity, after six months renounced the pontificate, and Boniface VIII. was elected.

    The History of Florence

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