Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A surname, cognate to the common noun butler.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English boteler, from Old French boutellier.

Examples

  • Captain Boteler died some years ago, but members of his family still reside in Lyme.

    Jane Austen: Her Homes and Her Friends

  • His admonition about confidentiality notwithstanding, Stuart almost assuredly wanted Boteler to use the arguments in the letters for his promotion.

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • “Everything betokened an immediate movement at Headquarters,” noted Boteler.

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • A former Whig politician and member of the United States House of Representatives, Boteler had served in the same capacity with Stonewall Jackson.

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • When Stuart read that John Hood, his junior in rank, had been promoted to lieutenant general, he declared in a letter to Boteler: For my part, I yield to no man in the Confederacy in quantity and quality of service.

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • The cane had been crafted from a cedar tree at Mount Vernon, and had been given to Boteler by the stepgrandson of the Revolutionary War hero and first president.18

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • With Boteler still holding his seat in the Congress in Richmond during the winter, Stuart approached his influential friend about a concern that had gnawed at the general for months.

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • Four days later in a second letter, Stuart renewed his argument to Boteler: A military man without aspirations is like a vessel without sail—a compass without the needle.

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • Had the Yankees fired their rifles, thought Alexander Boteler, the result “might have been of most disastrous consequences to the Confederate cause.”

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • The scene moved Boteler, “it was really a grand spectacle to see these gallant horsemen coming toward us out of the gloom of night into the glare of the fire, making their welkin ring with their mild war cries and the earth to tremble beneath their horses hoofs.”

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

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