Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Although Brookner is an unconvincing and stilted writer of dialogue, there are a few splendid exchanges in scenes of sitcom horror.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • The moment of dramatic disclosure in Brookner's novels is often the payoff, the entertainment that allows the reader a smile at the heroine's expense.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • Although Brookner is an unconvincing and stilted writer of dialogue, there are a few splendid exchanges in scenes of sitcom horror.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • To suggest that Brookner is a comic writer might seem perverse; she is, after all, celebrated as the mistress of gloom, the creator of a claustrophobic, overfurnished world in which heat is always oppressive, in which a cup of warm milk offers a welcome conclusion to a slow day of perambulation, in which rejection usually leads to physical decline, and in which anything so robust as physical exercise is roundly condemned.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • To suggest that Brookner is a comic writer might seem perverse; she is, after all, celebrated as the mistress of gloom, the creator of a claustrophobic, overfurnished world in which heat is always oppressive, in which a cup of warm milk offers a welcome conclusion to a slow day of perambulation, in which rejection usually leads to physical decline, and in which anything so robust as physical exercise is roundly condemned.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • The moment of dramatic disclosure in Brookner's novels is often the payoff, the entertainment that allows the reader a smile at the heroine's expense.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • This is the philosophy that Anita Brookner has been ably illustrating since 1981, when she published the slyly witty autobiographical novel A Start in Life (titled The Debut in this country), a work that deliberately played on the title of Honoré de Balzac's Un Début dans la Vie.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • This is the philosophy that Anita Brookner has been ably illustrating since 1981, when she published the slyly witty autobiographical novel A Start in Life (titled The Debut in this country), a work that deliberately played on the title of Honoré de Balzac's Un Début dans la Vie.

    The Mistress of Gloom

  • Thirty seconds of that would make an all-night Prodigy gig seem like an evening sipping Earl Grey and reading Anita Brookner.

    So Lewis Hamilton wants a longer national anthem. Has he heard the second verse?

  • The weak link is Ellen Barkin, who is making her Broadway debut in the cartoonish role of Emma Brookner, a wheelchair-bound doctor and AIDS researcher who is as angry as Ned and twice as noble.

    Larry Kramer, Loud and Clear

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