Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of Brownist.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His feeling on the subject was thus expressed at the time: "As for those which we call Brownists, being, when they were at the most, a very small number of very silly and base people here and there in corners dispersed, they are now -- thanks be to God -- by the good remedies that have been used, suppressed and worn out, so as there is scarce any news of them."

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 11

  • "As for those which we call Brownists," wrote Bacon, "being when they were at the most a very small number of very silly and base people, here and there in corners dispersed, they are now, thanks to God, by the good remedies that have been used, suppressed and worn out; so that there is scarce any news of them."

    History of the English People, Volume V (of 8) Puritan England, 1603-1660

  • Holland, Here they were for a time called Brownists, after one who had been their leader in separation, but later they took the name of

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • Moreover the school commonly called Brownists, who developed into the sect of

    England under the Tudors

  • American shores, but a less aggressive people, who were called Brownists in derision, but who called themselves Separatists.

    Beginnings of the American People

  • Brown's writings, we learn from Baillie, had totally disappeared in England; so that the so-called Brownists can hardly have been his direct disciples, but must have been persons who had arrived at some of his opinions over again for themselves.

    The Life of John Milton

  • _ The Brownists were the religious followers of Robert Browne

    Poems of Henry Vaughan, Silurist, Volume II

  • Popular aversion was expressed by the derisive name of "Brownists," given them from Robert Browne, the first to set forth their doctrines in a formal pamphlet, entitled _The Life and Manners of True

    England in America, 1580-1652

  • A church of this order existed in London by 1568; another, possibly more than one, the "Brownists," by 1580.

    History of the United States, Volume 1 (of 6)

  • Elizabeth herself could not feel a bitterer abhorrence of the "Brownists" (as they were called from the name of their founder Robert Brown) who rejected the very notion of a national Church, and asserted the right of each congregation to perfect independence of faith and worship.

    History of the English People, Volume V (of 8) Puritan England, 1603-1660

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