Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A taxonomic family within the order Sapindales — the torchwood or incense trees, including both trees and shrubs, native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia and the Americas.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Bursera +‎ -aceae

Examples

  • Dipterocarps also dominate much of the canopy layer, but there are many other tree families such as Burseraceae, Sapotaceae, Euphorbiacae, Rubiaceae, Annonaceae, Lauraceae, and Myristicaceae.

    Mentawai Islands rain forests

  • The shrub layer consists of the families Sapindaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Anacardiaceae, and Burseraceae.

    Madagascar succulent woodlands

  • The plant families forming the canopy include Leguminosae, Euphorbiacae, Burseraceae, and Bombaceae.

    Madagascar succulent woodlands

  • (Burseraceae family), Tetrapterocarpon geayi (Leguminosae family), and Gyrocarpus americanus (Hernandiaceae family), as well as other species from the Euphorbiaceae, Leguminosae, and the baobabs of the Bombacaceae.

    Madagascar spiny thickets

  • A recent survey in the eastern spiny forest reported that the following families were the most dominant and diverse: Burseraceae, Didiereaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Anacardiaceae, and Fabaceae.

    Madagascar spiny thickets

  • Perhaps most impressive is that Rossel also contains an undescribed genus in the family Burseraceae.

    Louisiade Archipelago rain forests

  • Very large emergent trees are also present among the Anacardiaceae, Burseraceae, Dipterocarpaceae, and Schima crenata.

    Southern Annamites montane rain forests

  • Other canopy and understory tree families that are common include Burseraceae, Sapotaceae, Euphorbiacae, Rubiaceae, Annonaceae, Lauraceae, and Myristicaceae.

    Sumatran lowland rain forests

  • Dominant families at the Jaú river mouth are Palmae, Leguminosae and Chrysobalanaceae, and of the middle reaches, Leguminosae, Burseraceae, Palmae, Myristicaceae and Moraceae.

    Central Amazonian Conservation Complex, Brazil

  • Dense evergreen trees characterize the lowland forest up to 800 m, with a canopy exceeding 30 m, and taller emergents such as Canarium (Burseraceae), Albizia (Fabaceae), and Brochoneura acuminata (Myristaceae).

    Madagascar lowland forests

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