Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of CAPTCHA.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The beauty of most modern CAPTCHAs is that they simply take Latin characters, so they don't actually need to understand what the words mean.

    Spammers Use The Human Touch To Avoid CAPTCHA

  • Here's an interesting proposal to replace the text in CAPTCHAs (those boxes where you type distorted words) with text that has stymied the optical character recognition software used to digitize old public domain books.

    Boing Boing

  • The puzzles are called CAPTCHAs, and a human can decipher them but a computer can't.

    NPR Topics: News

  • Even if workers are paid just $3 per 1,000 CAPTCHAs, that is expensive, he says,

    doggdot.us

  • All bloggers and blog users are familiar with these "CAPTCHAs".

    Colleague's CAPTCHA

  • Putting obstacles such as CAPTCHAs (Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart) in the way of a brute-force attacker are a good way to slow them down, the Imperva report noted.

    PC Advisor News

  • A similar type of stupidity leads people to design CAPTCHAs that rely on very close shades of color - something humans find difficult but machines find really quite easy to process.

    Discourse.net: Yuk

  • Walpha even makes CAPTCHAs and offers web site statistics given a URL.

    First Look At Wolfram Alpha’s Impressive Knowledge Computation | Lifehacker Australia

  • This is a much more robust method than recruiting CAPTCHA-resolvers and paying them a few pennies to resolve new account application CAPTCHAs in real time, as we wrote about in this story.

    Facebook users unwittingly spread Koobface worm

  • I recalled that, in a previous post about web accessibility, a reader offered negative CAPTCHAs – whereby spambots must prove they are bots rather than requiring humans prove they are indeed human when leaving blog comments – are accessible alternative.

    Do It Myself Blog – Glenda Watson Hyatt » 2009 » March

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.