Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A Native American people formerly inhabiting the southwest coast of Florida from Tampa Bay to the Florida Keys. The Calusa were extinct by the mid-18th century.
  • n. A member of this people.
  • n. The extinct language of the Calusa, of unknown linguistic affiliation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. a Native American people who lived on the coast and along the inner waterways of Florida's southwest coast.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Calusa, fierce people (sense uncertain); perhaps akin to Choctaw kallo, strong.

Examples

  • “He called Calusa Springs to ask about her maybe renting there.”

    Alice in Jeopardy

  • Panfílo de Narváez, a red-haired, one-eyed, mean son of Spain, famous for ordering the slaughter of 2,500 native people in Cuba, got the license to run Florida after Juan Ponce de León succumbed to that Calusa arrow.

    Dream State

  • Besides, he thought the poetical old Calusa name “Miami” would draw more paying customers.

    Dream State

  • They get their first real clue on a call they make to Calusa Springs.

    Alice in Jeopardy

  • She tells him that GTE here in Florida was able to provide a New Orleans phone number for the call made to Harper Realty in Calusa Springs.

    Alice in Jeopardy

  • Said he was trying to locate two women traveling together, a blonde and a black woman, who may have rented recently here in Calusa Springs.

    Alice in Jeopardy

  • From A.D. 800 into the seventeenth century this coast was dominated by the Calusa (said to mean "the fierce people" in their language).

    Water World

  • Though archaeologists have long known about the Calusa, thanks to information gleaned largely from accounts and letters penned by Spanish officials and Jesuit missionaries in the late 1560s, it's only in the last three decades that modern investigators have begun to unravel the secrets of these native peoples and their ancestors.

    Water World

  • Florida Bay was full of them and, still farther south, the Key West area had its own share—tiny tufts of greenery punctuating the saltwater flats out beyond Boca Chica, beyond Sugarloaf Key, offshore from the Snipe Keys and Squirrel Key and Johnston Key, out between the Bob Allen Keys and the Calusa Keys, north of Crawl Key, north of Fiesta Key, all the way back to Key Largo.

    The Song of The Dodo

  • "Those stakes were all empty, and Thread-ridden, though Calusa, Ted Tubberman's old place, wasn't."

    Chronicles of Pern, First Fall

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