Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A person from Cappadocia
  • adj. of or pertaining to Cappadocia

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the inscriptions of Mitanni, the writing is a mixture of ideographs and syllables, just as in Mesopotamia, while the so-called 'Cappadocian' tablets are written in a corrupt Babylonian, corresponding in degree to the 'corrupt' forms that the signs take on.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 2: Assizes-Browne

  • Mesopotamia, while the so-called "Cappadocian" tablets are written in a corrupt Babylonian, corresponding in degree to the "corrupt" forms that the signs take on.

    The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria

  • George, 119 from his parents or his education, surnamed the Cappadocian, was born at Epiphania in Cilicia, in a fuller’s shop.

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • Benedict also discusses such great Christian figures as Tertullian, Origen, Cyprian of Carthage, the Cappadocian Fathers, as well as the giants John Chrysostom, Jerome, and Augustine.

    "Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ"

  • Others, which he calls geoglyphs, are place-specific cultural symbols inscribed on the earth using stonewalls of various heights and thickness like the Chai in Israel or a Cappadocian horse in Turkey.

    Andrea R. Vaucher: Andrew Rogers: Rhythms of Life on Seven Continents

  • The wine was Cappadocian, and we got Stardust on IFE.

    We know Major Tom's a junkie

  • Asia Minor was a linguistic patchwork; in the interior Cappadocian, Isaurian and Lycaonian continued to be spoken till the end of the imperial period, and the people of Galatia, whose ancestors had emigrated there from Gaul hundreds of years earlier, still spoke in St Jerome's day a language similar to that of the district round Trier in north-east Gaul.

    THE PLAIN MAN'S GUIDE TO LATIN IN THE LITURGY

  • Cappadocian comes out, "he said;" never cheats himself out of anything and I admire him for it, so help me Hercules, I do.

    Satyricon

  • At that time, we had a Cappadocian slave, tall, very bold, and he had muscle too; he could hold a mad bull in the air!

    Satyricon

  • This was no Cappadocian village in a tufa cliff, this was a daunting task even for a Caesar, whose siege experience had been very different.

    Antony and Cleopatra

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