Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. Language spoken in the Philippines in and near the province of Cebu.
  • adj. Pertaining to the Cebuano language or to its speakers.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • proper n. The language of the people of Cebu in the Philippines; its lexicon contributes to the official languag of the Philippines.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. language of the people of Cebu in the Philippines; its lexicon contributes to the official language of the Philippines

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • These were published between 1904 and 1938 in Tagalog, Cebuano and Hiligaynon.

    FO: Plays

  • Tagalog seems to be pretty consistently misidentified as Cebuano, although both are listed.

    languagehat.com: LANGUAGE GUESSER.

  • And the language he learned and heard since that time are the Cebuano dialect and tagalog language which is taught in the early years of schooling in the Philippines.

    In Defense of Manny Pacquiao

  • I know enough to eavesdrop every time my mom gets on the phone and talks boisterously in Cebuano.

    Top 10 Things I'd Like to Do While Living In Asia

  • I can picture you munching on a crunchy skin of a Cebuano lechon but not the dread of witnessing a pig's unceremonious death Pinoy style.

    Pig Killing

  • Languages: Filipino (official; based on Tagalog) and English (official); eight major dialects - Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon or Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, and Pangasinan

    Philippines

  • Ethnic groups: Tagalog 28.1%, Cebuano 13.1%, Ilocano 9%, Bisaya/Binisaya 7.6%, Hiligaynon Ilonggo 7.5%, Bikol 6%, Waray 3.4%, other 25.3% (2000 census)

    Philippines

  • PhilippinesFilipino (official; based on Tagalog) and English (official); eight major dialects - Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon or Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, and Pangasinan

    Languages

  • I believe that even if you use Filipino/Cebuano/Ilocano/another native language as the medium of instruction in your school, you CAN have children who are eager to study, and consequently an intelligent and globally competitive workforce.

    Another Look At Languages In The Philippines (Updated)

  • I speak Cebuano, another Filipino language and a good bit of Tagalog.

    Living in Mexico

Comments

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