Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • During the previous summer, Henry Luce had put Chennault on the cover of Life magazine, along with an article by journalist Jack Belden, who called Chennault “the one genius that war on the Asiatic mainland has yet produced.”

    The Last Empress

  • The Chinese pilots called Chennault “Leatherface.”

    Human Smoke

  • It thus interlocked with the so-called Chennault circle (or Chennault's "Washington squadron"), the powerful cabal put together with Roosevelt's blessing in 1940 to enable the equipment, staffing, and financial support of General Claire Chennault's Flying Tigers in China.

    Dandelion Salad

  • But I remember the pilots gave him a good-sounding Chinese name, Shan Nao, which sounded like "Chennault": shan as in "lightning," nao as in "noisy," Noisy lightning was like the sound of airplanes racing across the sky-zah!

    The Kitchen God's wife

  • Yet Frank McLynn, in "The Burma Campaign," argues that the effort was one largely inspired by President Franklin Roosevelt's desperation to keep China in the war; that it was a campaign in which many important decisions were made by American generals, such as Joseph "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell and Claire Lee Chennault; and that, because the fighting ended up killing 144,000 Japanese soldiers, it had a significant impact on U.S. success in the Pacific.

    Still Forgotten

  • Before he landed in Chungking, Donovan had his plane stop at Kunming in southwestern China to arrange for an OSS detachment to provide targeting intelligence to Brigadier General Claire Chennault, the maverick Flying Tigers commander who now led the 14th Air Force attacking Japanese troops on the mainland.

    Wild Bill Donovan

  • Their leader was the famous general Claire Chennault.

    Flying Tiger

  • Before he landed in Chungking, Donovan had his plane stop at Kunming in southwestern China to arrange for an OSS detachment to provide targeting intelligence to Brigadier General Claire Chennault, the maverick Flying Tigers commander who now led the 14th Air Force attacking Japanese troops on the mainland.

    Wild Bill Donovan

  • Mr. McLynn is as unsparing of the senior commanders in Burma as they were of each other: The "mentally unstable" Wingate is posthumously diagnosed with bipolar disorder; Chennault suffered from "monomania," was "essentially false" and "joined in the Chinese elite's corruption and peculation with avidity"; Chiang is described as having given his second wife a nasty venereal disease on their wedding night.

    Still Forgotten

  • An introverted Yankee West Pointer, Stilwell also couldn't stand the extrovert Southerner iconoclast Chennault, a feeling—like most of these top-brass antagonisms—that was richly reciprocated.

    Still Forgotten

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