Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A member of an extinct Indian people once inhabiting central Colombia.
  • noun The extinct Chibchan language of the Chibcha.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • At a time of the conquistadors when the New World was being discovered and tales of riches abounded, the ancient Inca Aztec and Chibcha civilisations enjoyed their wondrous riches.

    Why Amazon?

  • At a time of the conquistadors when the New World was being discovered and tales of riches abounded, the ancient Inca Aztec and Chibcha civilisations enjoyed their wondrous riches.

    Archive 2008-05-01

  • Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada (1495–1576), under commission from the government of Santa Marta, moved up the Magdalena River, reached the plateau of Bogotá, defeated and sacked Chibcha chiefdoms, and founded Santa Fe de Bogotá (1538).

    3. Venezuela and Nueva Granada, 1521-1549

  • The Chibcha used to feed it to the slaves and wives of dead kings and then bury them alive in the royal tomb.

    One River

  • The Chibcha used to feed it to the slaves and wives of dead kings and then bury them alive in the royal tomb.

    One River

  • A more macabre use was recorded from the New World, where the Chibcha Indians of highland Colombia administered a close relative of datura to the wives and slaves of dead kings, before burying them alive with their deceased masters.

    The Serpent and the Rainbow

  • Chibcha folk-lore, and is represented as an old man who came to

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

  • The Chibcha race was virtually exterminated by the Spanish conquerors in their thirst for gold, but in Ecuador, Peru, and

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Of these the most populous, most important, and best known were the Quichua, whose great empire of Peru, with its capital at Cuzco, dominated the whole region west of the great Cordillera from the Chibcha territory to about the 35th parallel in Chile, with outlying colonies among the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • The linguistic stock was scattered over a greater area, and indications even authorize philologists to admit as highly probable a connection between the Chibcha dialects and some of the idioms of Costa Rica.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

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