Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A taxonomic genus within the family Chlamydomonadaceae — a unicellular green alga.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

New Latin, from Ancient Greek χλαμύς (khlamus, "cloak, mantle") + μονάς (monas, "solitary").

Examples

  • For the green algae study, Niyogi and his collaborators worked with an algal organism called Chlamydomonas, which is considered "the fruit fly of the algae world," in terms of being a genetic model for other eukaryotic algae.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • For the green algae study, Niyogi and his collaborators worked with an algal organism called Chlamydomonas, which is considered "the fruit fly of the algae world," in terms of being a genetic model for other eukaryotic algae.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Spalding, professor and chair of genetics, development and cell biology and a council member of Iowa State's Plant Sciences Institute, is working with the one type of alga, Chlamydomonas, that is already genetically mapped.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Spalding, professor and chair of genetics, development and cell biology and a council member of Iowa State's Plant Sciences Institute, is working with the one type of alga, Chlamydomonas, that is already genetically mapped.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • In the scientists 'case, they stole electrons from a widespread and well studied algae called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    ABC News: ABCNews

  • In the scientists 'case, they stole electrons from a widespread and well studied algae called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    ABC News: ABCNews

  • Grossman points out that it makes evolutionary sense that a soil organism such as Chlamydomonas would have a variety of metabolic pathways at its disposal.

    New Possibilities For Hydrogen-producing Algae | Impact Lab

  • Grossman points out that it makes evolutionary sense that a soil organism such as Chlamydomonas would have a variety of metabolic pathways at its disposal.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Grossman points out that it makes evolutionary sense that a soil organism such as Chlamydomonas would have a variety of metabolic pathways at its disposal.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • Rhodopsin-regulated calcium currents in Chlamydomonas.

    World Wide Mind

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