Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Christians considered as a group.
  • n. The Christian world.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The name received at baptism; any name or appellation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The profession of faith in Christ by baptism; hence, the Christian religion, or the adoption of it.
  • n. The name received at baptism; or, more generally, any name or appelation.
  • n. That portion of the world in which Christianity prevails, or which is governed under Christian institutions, in distinction from heathen or Mohammedan lands.
  • n. The whole body of Christians.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The profession of faith in Christ by baptism; hence, adoption of faith in Christ; personal Christianity; baptism.
  • n. The part of the world in which the Christian religion predominates; the Christian world.
  • n. The whole body of Christians.
  • n. [lowercase] The name received at baptism; hence, any name or epithet.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the collective body of Christians throughout the world and history (found predominantly in Europe and the Americas and Australia)

Etymologies

Middle English Cristendom, from Old English cristendōm : cristen, Christian; see Christian + -dōm, -dom.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old English cristendōm, corresponding to Christian +‎ -dom. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • As these separated communities when massed together, indeed in some cases even of themselves, count a vast number of souls, among whom many are conspicuous for their religious earnestness, this extension of the term Christendom to include them all has its solid justification.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 15: Tournely-Zwirner

  • If, then, we limit the application of the term Christendom to this, its most authentic expression, the unity of Christendom is not a lost ideal to be recovered, but a stupendous reality which has always been in stable possession.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 15: Tournely-Zwirner

  • People meant what they said when they said the word Christendom.

    CNN.com

  • (By the way, Carl, the link on Dividing of Christendom is broken.)

    New books due out this fall from Ignatius Press

  • "There's not a magazine in Christendom that would dare to publish it — you know that."

    Chapter 35

  • Even in Christendom, it is presumed our minds and hearts are frequently deceived.

    C.S. Lewis on Evolutionism (the Myth)

  • Sadly, what is unimaginable in Christendom has not only occurred, but passes virtually without recognition, in the Islamic world.

    Archive 2008-04-01

  • Anti-Semitism (and its supposed Scriptural and religious justification) was prevalent in Christendom for many centuries leading up to the holocaust.

    Darwin Strips Reality of Purpose?

  • Ecclesiastical term as of a bishop without a see in Christendom

    Latin Quotations | Impact Lab

  • But the idea of Heaven Above has no literal meaning, something rather upsetting to many in Christendom when Galileo kept insisting upon pointing it out.

    A Message About ID

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