Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Relating to the Cimbri, an ancient tribe inhabiting northern Germany.
  • proper noun The language of the Cimbri.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Such is the scenery which surrounds what remains of Strata Florida: those scanty broken ruins compose all which remains of that celebrated monastery, in which saints and mitred abbots were buried, and in which, or in whose precincts, was buried Dafydd Ab Gwilym, the greatest genius of the Cimbric race and one of the first poets of the world.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • But I will not do what a prudent man ought to do — kill the Cimbric lump.

    The Grass Crown

  • Then eighteen years old, now twenty, he was a gigantic German of the Cimbric nation, by name of Burgundus.

    The Grass Crown

  • Quintus Lutatius Catulus Caesar, he who prates that he beat the Cimbric Germans in Italian Gaul, when we all know it was Gaius Marius?

    The Grass Crown

  • Catulus Caesar he doubted he could ever win over entirely, due to events along the Athesis River when the Cimbric Germans had invaded Italian Gaul.

    The Grass Crown

  • At his side rode the hulking Cimbric slave Burgundus in beautiful golden armor, girt with a sword, and mounted upon a Bastamian horse so big its hooves were the size of buckets.

    The Grass Crown

  • There was no sentiment or attraction of any kind in his selection of the Cheruscic Hermana; simply, she needed him more than a Cimbric woman would have within the tribal enclave, and also owed the tribe far less than a Cimbric woman would have.

    The First Man in Rome

  • Her man had been the chief of his Cimbric tribe; otherwise the women of the tribe would never have tolerated her foreign presence among them when, in effect, she usurped a place which ought to have been filled by a Cimbric woman.

    The First Man in Rome

  • Even so, sixty thousand live Cimbric women and children were sold to the slavers, as were twenty thousand warriors.

    The First Man in Rome

  • The front ranks of Cimbric horses were falling in hundreds before the rain of Samnite spears, warriors struggling to free themselves from fallen steeds, tangling themselves into an ever-increasing chaos as more Samnite spears hurtled to stick into heaving equine sides, chests, rumps, necks, flanks; and the rear ranks of Cimbric horse penned on the other side of the Samnites fared no better.

    The First Man in Rome

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