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Examples

  • Machyn is captured and put to death, and Clarenceux and Machyn's wife are forced to go on the run, desperate to solve the clues contained in the book before Walsingham's forces catch up with them.

    Crime fiction roundup

  • Catholic protagonist Clarenceux, former soldier and herald turned action hero in a grimy doublet, is tasked by his old friend Henry Machyn with protecting his manuscript from Walsingham, the paranoid secret service chief.

    Crime fiction roundup

  • Dethick, the Garter King, and of Camden, the Clarenceux King, granting the required 'exemplification' and authorising the required impalement and quartering.

    A Life of William Shakespeare with portraits and facsimiles

  • The poet's father or the poet himself when first applying to the College stated that John Shakespeare, in 1568, while he was bailiff of Stratford, and while he was by virtue of that office a justice of the peace, had obtained from Robert Cook, then Clarenceux herald, a 'pattern' or sketch of an armorial coat.

    A Life of William Shakespeare with portraits and facsimiles

  • {193} The details of Brooke's accusation are not extant, and are only to be deduced from the answer of Garter and Clarenceux to Brooke's complaint, two copies of which are accessible: one is in the vol. W-Z at the Heralds 'College, f. 276; and the other, slightly differing, is in

    A Life of William Shakespeare with portraits and facsimiles

  • Clarenceux, King-of-Arms, the grant of arms to Shakespeare was recognised, 1599.

    Bacon is Shake-Speare

  • Marlborough has changed its armorial bearings several times; but the present coat, containing a white bull, was granted by Harvey, Clarenceux in A.D.

    Notes and Queries, Number 231, April 1, 1854 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • KINGS-OF-ARMS -- _Garter_, _Clarenceux_, and _Norroy_; six HERALDS, who have precedence by seniority of appointment -- _Chester_, _Lancaster_,

    The Handbook to English Heraldry

  • Clarenceux and Norroy have the same shield, but the former has _a lion of England only, crowned, on a chief gules_; and the latter, _on a chief per pale az. and gu. _, has

    The Handbook to English Heraldry

  • Then the two provincial kings, Clarenceux and Norroy, proceeded along the choir, and making due reverences to the altar and the sovereign, bowed to the two senior knights; who thereupon advanced towards the altar, and kneeling down, made their offering.

    Windsor Castle

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