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Etymologies

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Examples

  • ET: The Associated Press quotes a neighbor of the victims, Tina Claybourne, as describing the mother as "a very good mom."

    Mom drives into river, drowning 3 kids, self

  • Tina Claybourne, who lives nearby, said, She was a very good mom … She always was with her kids.

    N.Y. town reeling after family drowns

  • However this time when the Earl of Claybourne enters a ballroom uninvited as always, one woman stares right back at him.

    In Bed with the Devil- Lorraine Heath « The Merry Genre Go Round Reviews

  • Kittrell and the azalea bowled along Claybourne Avenue; he leaned back on the cushions, and adopted the expression of ennui appropriate to that thoroughfare.

    Americans All Stories of American Life of To-Day

  • Then the thought came to him that now, as the cartoonist on the _Telegraph_, his name would become as well known in Claybourne Avenue as it had been in the homes of the poor and humble during his years on the _Post_.

    Americans All Stories of American Life of To-Day

  • He was certainly, to put it politely, a violator of the revenue, and Governor Claybourne had put a price upon his head, when, at an opportune moment for him, General Jackson and his army arrived in

    My beloved South,

  • "And a passing fair one," said Claybourne under his breath.

    To Have and to Hold

  • "A young gentleman that used to come here for the fishing, now and then," answered Claybourne, pointing at the river.

    The Paradise Mystery

  • "The fact is, I was referred to you, yesterday, by the present vicar of Braden Medworth -- both he, and the sexton there, Claybourne, whom you, of course, remember, thought you would be able to give me some information on a subject which is of great importance -- to me."

    The Paradise Mystery

  • At this time one Captaine Claybourne was come from parts where wee intended to plant, to Virginia, and from him wee vnderstood, that all the natiues of these parts were in preparation of defence, by reason of a rumour somebody had raised amongst them, of sixe ships that were come with a power of Spanyards, whose meaning was to driue all the inhabitants out of the Countrey.

    Great Epochs in American History, Vol. II The Planting Of The First Colonies: 1562—1733

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