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Examples

  • Come with him as he revisits the era when sophistication was the order of the day, the Cotton Club was the place to go and Jazz/swing was the music of the time.

    Levern The Entertainer At Londel’s «

  • They could barhop in Virginia-Highland, another nice Atlanta neighborhood, or go to this amazing alternative rock club called the Cotton Club and listen to music.

    The Alphabetical Hookup List R-Z

  • No, it is not, unless you were looking for a very special "Cotton Club" episode of that show.

    Our mob mentality: Hank Stuever previews HBO's 'Boardwalk Empire'

  • "Cotton Club" came out during my heavy phase of listening to Duke Ellington, so I was anticipating great things.

    "The Rain People," "The Conversation," "Apocalypse Now," "Rumble Fish," and "Youth Without Youth."

  • Louisville Central Community Center will hold auditions for "Cotton Club" noon-4 p.m. Saturday at the center, 1300 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.

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  • As a young musician, Arlen studied the “race” records of Louis Armstrong, King Oliver, Fletcher Henderson, and other foundational jazz musicians, and formed an association with the Cotton Club in Harlem.

    A Renegade History of the United States

  • Blacks were barred from the iconic Cotton Club, where the chorus girls had to be light-skinned "tall, tan and terrific" and the great Duke Ellington had to turn out "jungle music" like "Creole Love Call" for them to shimmy to.

    The Mecca of Black America

  • The group recorded sporadically until 1934, when it claimed a coveted spot at Harlem's Cotton Club.

    Phil Ramone and Danielle Evin: Dog Ears Music: Volume 186

  • In New York in 1933, the band was booked into Harlem's Cotton Club and soon signed with Decca before going out on a four-month tour, billed as the "Harlem Express."

    Swing's Forgotten King

  • On his arrival in New York from Washington DC a dozen years earlier, the young Edward Kennedy Ellington – nicknamed "Duke" by a childhood friend – had begun collecting musicians; in 1927 they opened at Harlem's Cotton Club, playing to a white, high-society audience in a long engagement that became one of the landmarks of jazz history.

    Duke Ellington's mother dies

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