Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of Cyrenaic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This was the view adopted by the philosophical school known as the Cyrenaics, who advocated increasing desires and seeking ever new ways of gratifying them, so that the pleasure of replenishment could continue past the point where most people would feel satiated, and be available at every moment.

    Epicurus

  • Megarians, Cynics, Cyrenaics and of the ideas of Anaxagoras, in the

    Philebus

  • Cyrenaics too, though they are no longer “clothed in purple, and crowned with flowers, and fond of drink and of female flute-players.”

    Letters to Dead Authors

  • Cyrenaics in his doctrine of pleasure; asserting with more consistency than Anaxagoras the existence of an intelligent mind and cause.

    Philebus

  • The extreme and one-sided doctrines of the Cynics and Cyrenaics are included in a larger whole; the relations of pleasure and knowledge to each other and to the good are authoritatively determined; the Eleatic Being and the

    Philebus

  • Ah, here too, you might laugh, and fail to see where the Pleasure lies, when the Cyrenaics are no

    Letters to Dead Authors

  • And whereas they cry out and are offended in behalf of the sense, because the Cyrenaics say not that the thing without is hot, but that the effect made on the sense is such; is it not the same with what is said touching the taste, when they say that the thing without is not sweet, but that some function and motion about the sense is such?

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Cyrenaics must say that they are imprinted with the figure of a horse or of a wall, but refuse to speak of the horse or the wall; so also it is necessary to say that the sight is imprinted with a figure round or with three unequal sides, and not that the tower is in that manner triangular or round.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Cyrenaics may use as a strong argument against you Epicureans, that all the sense of pleasure which arises from the working of any object on the ear or eye is not in those organs, but in the intellect itself.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • Cyrenaics may use as a strong argument against you Epicureans, that all the sense of pleasure which arises from the working of any object on the ear or eye is not in those organs, but in the intellect itself.

    Symposiacs

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