Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun Irish mythology . An important god in Irish mythology.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

The Middle Irish name Dagda means "Good God" or "Shining God, from Old Irish Dagdae, from Proto-Celtic *Dago-deiwos, from Proto-Indo-European *dhagho- (“shining”) + *deiwos (“divinity”).

Examples

  • Within the myths, Tara is described as one of the dwelling places of Eochaid, the most important of the Irish gods, who is often referred to as the Dagda, "the good god."

    Tara Threatened

  • A tale of Nemedian settlers arriving to settle a beautiful green island in ancient times, and their encounters with both natural and supernatural allies and enemies (names like Dagda, Balor, Lir, Diancecht, etc are all thrown around with great energy).

    January Books 5) Shakespeare's Wife, by Germaine Greer

  • Ask for them by name: The Dagda, Morrigan, Aine, Danu.

    Archive 2009-05-01

  • Ask for them by name: The Dagda, Morrigan, Aine, Danu.

    A Modest Proposal

  • When Dagda saw the sun falling lower in the winter sky, he built a great fire and threw into his cauldron all the delicious meat and fruits of the earth.

    Christmas Feast

  • So today, we at "The Gods Are Bored" salue Bile and the Dagda, Ogma and other numerous male Celtic deities who are far better Daddy Gods than some of the deities in wider usage.

    Daddy Deities

  • According to Celtic mythology, the harvest god Dagda possessed a magical cauldron capable of supplying unlimited food.

    Christmas Feast

  • But as I come to know more about who I am as a Pagan, I recognize that I am really longing for a balance in my spiritual life between feminine and masculine characteristics of the Divine, so I very much appreciated the references in your post to Bile, the Dagda, and Ogma.

    Daddy Deities

  • When Dagda saw the sun falling lower in the winter sky, he built a great fire and threw into his cauldron all the delicious meat and fruits of the earth.

    Archive 2008-12-01

  • According to Celtic mythology, the harvest god Dagda possessed a magical cauldron capable of supplying unlimited food.

    Archive 2008-12-01

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.