Definitions

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  • adjective Of or relating to Donald Davidson (philosopher) (1917–2003), American philosopher.

Etymologies

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Davidson +‎ -ian

Examples

  • It is sentences, and not words, that are thus the primary focus for a Davidsonian theory of meaning.

    Donald Davidson

  • Both these features represent important advantages for the Davidsonian approach (Davidson's rejection of determinate meanings as having a significant role to play in a theory of meaning already involves a commitment to an extensional approach to language).

    Donald Davidson

  • Michael Dummett has been one of the most important critics of the Davidsonian position (see especially Dummett 1975).

    Donald Davidson

  • Indeed, we can speak of the Davidsonian account of interpretation as providing a quite general account of how mental content is determined (such content being understood as the content of propositional mental states such as belief): through the causal relation between speakers and objects in the world and through the rational integration of speakers 'behaviour.

    Donald Davidson

  • Compositionality does not compromise holism, since not only does it follow from it, but, on the Davidsonian approach, it is only as they play a role in whole sentences that individual words can be viewed as meaningful.

    Donald Davidson

  • The heart of a Davidsonian theory of interpretation is, of course, a Tarskian truth theory.

    Donald Davidson

  • (Humean theories, including their Davidsonian and Williamsian variants), or to procedures for checking that a plan of action was supported by sufficient yet consistent reasons (Kantian theories), or to the ultrarefined sensibilities of the practically intelligent reasoner (Aristotelian theories).

    Practical Reason and the Structure of Actions

  • Philosophers who eschew meanings altogether (such as those who favor Davidsonian theories of meaning) seek semantic theories that ascribe only extensions to indexical expressions (e.g., truth values to sentences, and referents to singular terms), with respect to contexts and (perhaps) other parameters.

    Again

  • What the Davidsonian account of knowledge and interpretation demonstrates, however, is that no such distinction can be drawn.

    Donald Davidson

  • The principle itself is not so, however, since it remains, on the Davidsonian account, a presupposition of any interpretation whatsoever.

    Donald Davidson

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