Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A region of the southeast United States, usually comprising the states of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun a descriptive category of cultural and geographic subregions in the American South

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the southeastern region of the United States: South Carolina and Georgia and Alabama and Mississippi and Louisiana; prior to the American Civil War all these states produced cotton and permitted slavery

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For those of us born and raised in what is called the Deep South, at a time when signs labeling water fountains according to one skin color or the other's use, it is a fine accomplishment to celebrate.

    Pondering Penguin

  • I've spent far more time in south Georgia than I have in West Tennessee, and that's another kind of Deep South entirely.

    Nashville

  • I've spent far more time in south Georgia than I have in West Tennessee, and that's another kind of Deep South entirely.

    Archive 2007-10-01

  • Most states of the Deep South had two Democratic parties—one white, one black.

    The Good Fight

  • Most states of the Deep South had two Democratic parties—one white, one black.

    The Good Fight

  • Most states of the Deep South had two Democratic parties—one white, one black.

    The Good Fight

  • The frigid temperatures followed a powerful blizzard that howled through the nation's midsection Wednesday and made its way into the Deep South, where it brought a mix of rain and snow to some areas.

    Snow, bitter cold spread across Plains, South

  • Yes, the civil rights movement of the Deep South had a list of grievances, too - the right to vote and to attend better, integrated schools - but on the "Bloody Sunday" morning of March 7, 1965, all that Lewis and 600 other people wanted was to walk as free men and women across the Edmund Pettus Bridge without Alabama state troopers whacking the living daylights out of them.

    Will Bunch: October 1, 2011: The Day the Future Crossed a Bridge

  • Yes, the civil rights movement of the Deep South had a list of grievances, too - the right to vote and to attend better, integrated schools - but on the "Bloody Sunday" morning of March 7, 1965, all that Lewis and 600 other people wanted was to walk as free men and women across the Edmund Pettus Bridge without Alabama state troopers whacking the living daylights out of them.

    Will Bunch: October 1, 2011: The Day the Future Crossed a Bridge

  • In November 1860 the election of Republican presidential candidate Lincoln triggered secession by the states in the Deep South.

    Between War and Peace

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