Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A river rising in western Ukraine and flowing about 1,365 km (850 mi) generally southeast through eastern Moldova then back into Ukraine where it empties into the Black Sea near Odessa. It formed the Soviet-Romanian border from 1918 to 1940.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A river in Eastern Europe, flowing through Ukraine and Moldova to the Black Sea.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Still journeying to the north and east, he crossed the river which we now call the Dniester, and there, finding a rocky hill rising from an immense plain, he formed a cell near its summit, and settled himself down to end his life in self-denial and meditation.

    The Last of the Legions and Other Tales of Long Ago

  • "There used to be empty fields with some tribes" before Russians arrived along the Dniester River, says Dmitriy Soin, a member of the Supreme Soviet.

    In This Tiny Land, Some Wish They Were Back in the U.S.S.R.

  • The first sign that something was afoot came when we reached a bridge over the Dniester River.

    Finding Yourself in a Country That Isn't

  • Only in a strip of Moldova between the Dniester River and the Ukrainian border did local Russians take up arms.

    The Return

  • Suddenly, the residents on the east side of the Dniester River, who felt closer to the former Soviet bloc, and the government on the west side, more allied with Romania, found themselves in conflict.

    Finding Yourself in a Country That Isn't

  • TIRASPOL, Moldova—Past a checkpoint manned by fur-hatted Russian soldiers with assault rifles and across a bridge spanning the Dniester River, sprawls a throwback to the days of the Cold War.

    In This Tiny Land, Some Wish They Were Back in the U.S.S.R.

  • Only in a strip of Moldova between the Dniester River and the Ukrainian border did local Russians take up arms.

    The Return

  • Only in a strip of Moldova between the Dniester River and the Ukrainian border did local Russians take up arms.

    The Return

  • Only in a strip of Moldova between the Dniester River and the Ukrainian border did local Russians take up arms.

    The Return

  • Mr. Lilin was born into a tightly knit society of Siberian bandits, known as Urkas gulag slang for thieves, living in exile in Transnistria, a tiny quasi-state that runs along the Dniester River between Ukraine and Moldova.

    Here Come the Cops—Steppe on It

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