Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The exponential intergral, a special function, defined as:

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the most general case, an aggregate index can be represented as: where f () and g () are functions, λit are weights, the Ei are the N different energy vectors and Et is the aggregate energy index in period t.

    Net energy analysis

  • It was also known as Ei-Ptah -- "the House of Phthah."

    Ancient Egypt

  • God is also named as to His so many other natures such as Ei (God), Ei Shaddai (God the abundant-from the word breast).

    Thoughts on the nature of God

  • 'Ei' pbnit iV Tivt X$yeiv. ef explkat apud ali - quemdicere.

    Clavdii Aeliani ... Varia historia, graece adnotationibvs lae. Perizonii in primis et aliorvm selectis instrveta ..

  • Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki of Japan, and American Richard Heck won the 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for developing a carbon-bonding process that has enabled the creation of everything from anti-inflammatory drugs to super-thin computer screens.

    Peruvian Writer Wins Nobel Prize in Literature

  • Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki of Japan, and American Richard Heck won the 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a carbon-bonding process that has enabled the creation of everything from anti-inflammatory drugs to super-thin computer screens.

    Two Americans, British Cypriot Awarded Nobel for Economics

  • The chemistry award went to Richard Heck and Japanese researchers Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki for designing techniques to bind together carbon atoms.

    Nobel Economics Prizes 2010 Announced; 2 Americans Win

  • The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences honored Richard Heck of the U.S. and Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki of Japan for developing a sophisticated chemical tool known as palladium-catalyzed cross couplings.

    Trio Shares Chemistry Prize for Imitating Life

  • Nobel Prize Winners: Past and Present Associated Press, AFP/Getty Images (2) From left: Akira Suzuki, Ei-ichi Negishi and American Richard Heck won the 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a chemical method that has allowed scientists to make medicines and better electronics.

    Trio Shares Chemistry Prize for Imitating Life

  • Reuters Ei-ichi Negishi of Purdue University speaks with the media on the phone after winning the 2010 Nobel Prize for chemistry, at his home in West Laffayette, Ind. The Nobel Prize for Chemistry was awarded to a trio of scientists who came up with an elegant way to mesh together stubborn carbon atoms, an approach vital for the development of novel medicines, materials and electronics.

    Trio Shares Chemistry Prize for Imitating Life

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