Elburz Mountains love

Elburz Mountains

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A range of northern Iran rising to 5,671 m (18,606 ft) at Mount Damavand, Iran's highest point.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Macedonian army climbed out of the deserts and over the high Elburz Mountains towards a semi-tropical paradise full of fig trees, grapevines, and fields of grain.

    Alexander the Great

  • They reached Rhagae in only eleven days and at last saw the towering Elburz Mountains rising before them.

    Alexander the Great

  • The Macedonian army climbed out of the deserts and over the high Elburz Mountains towards a semi-tropical paradise full of fig trees, grapevines, and fields of grain.

    Alexander the Great

  • They reached Rhagae in only eleven days and at last saw the towering Elburz Mountains rising before them.

    Alexander the Great

  • The Macedonian army climbed out of the deserts and over the high Elburz Mountains towards a semi-tropical paradise full of fig trees, grapevines, and fields of grain.

    Alexander the Great

  • They reached Rhagae in only eleven days and at last saw the towering Elburz Mountains rising before them.

    Alexander the Great

  • But here, a six-hour drive over the craggy Elburz Mountains from the capital, foreign and Iranian archaeologists have gathered amicably to discuss ancient Iran's relations with the larger Bronze Age world.

    Insider: The New Bronze Age

  • Juniper (Juniperus polycarpos) forest once covered the southern slopes of the Elburz Mountains, as evidenced by numerous remnants, and could be found up to altitudes of 1,900m to 2,000m.

    Elburz Range forest steppe

  • Juniperus polycarpos forest, which once covered the southern slopes of the Elburz Mountains, exists now largely in scattered remnants and at higher altitudes in relatively inaccessible areas.

    Elburz Range forest steppe

  • Even its length is unclear: its western terminal was flooded by the rising waters of the Caspian Sea, while to the east it runs into the unexplored mountainous landscape of the Elburz Mountains.

    Archive 2008-04-01

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