Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A female given name, variant of Eleanor

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He who had been brought from town, from his own comforts such as they were, to be consulted about this brat, this child which belonged to the dis-Honourable Phil; and Elinor, _Elinor_, of all people in the world, threw up her head and confronted him with disdain because he called the brat it, and not him or her, whichever it was.

    The Marriage of Elinor

  • Her first published book, Sense and Sensibility, though composed in epistolary form under the title Elinor and Marianne as early as 1795 “ 1796, was not actually published until 1811, when its author was thirty-six years old and had only six more years to live.

    The Ideal Woman

  • If Elinor is narrating, it makes more sense of the fact that everyone else in the novel thinks the Miss Steeles, Lucy especially, are wonderful young women.

    2009 January « paper fruit

  • If Elinor is narrating, it makes more sense of the fact that everyone else in the novel thinks the Miss Steeles, Lucy especially, are wonderful young women.

    women’s writing « paper fruit

  • Frost’s wife of forty-three years, Elinor, is a somewhat shadowy presence in the book: Frost describes her as “fragile and silent and black-eyed and beautiful” (82) with “a haunted look in her eye” (84).

    Fall of Frost by Brian Hall: Questions

  • I do not mean to suggest that Elinor is less significant than Marianne.

    Money, Matrimony, and Memory: Secondary Heroines in Radcliffe, Austen, and Cooper

  • Marianne has sympathy for Elinor because Elinor is experiencing something that Marianne has also experienced: the marriage of a former suitor.

    Money, Matrimony, and Memory: Secondary Heroines in Radcliffe, Austen, and Cooper

  • Dialogue is all-important in Elinor Lipman's novels.

    The Pursuit of Alice Thrift by Elinor Lipman: Questions

  • The good, old Island blood in Elinor's veins showed to some purpose.

    Further Chronicles of Avonlea

  • Yes, one could argue that Marianne is incredibly selfish, as her behavior has the potential to ruin Elinor’s matrimonial viability, but at the same time she is speaking truth to power in a compelling way, and I feel like through Marianne, Austen herself is questioning social mores.

    begone, black and blue « paper fruit

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.