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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Cotton also appeared to compromise his claim to be wholly independent in the lead up to his appointment last week when he labelled England's World Cup campaign a "failure" before questioning the progress made in the three years since Johnson took over.

    Evening Standard - Home

  • What happened out there was what we expected if we didn't do what we needed to do, Johnson said, referring to England's flatness in the first half and the mistakes that littered their performance throughout.

    England hang on to their grand design with sloppy win over Scotland

  • I would love Bangladesh to go through, but I am hopelessly hooked on that vogue drug called 'England's 2011 World Cup Campaign'.

    Bangladesh v South Africa - live! | Rob Smyth

  • Millennium Stadium tomorrow and victory would perhaps support the notion England's involvement in a Home Nations tournament would not be folly after all.

    Evening Standard - Home

  • Already in flow is a heated debate about what the Italian should do about the player universally known as "England's talisman".

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • I cannot imagine we would have any objection to the idea of England's players having poppies on their shirts.

    WalesOnline - Home

  • Wales had to win in Paris by 27 points to be certain of snatching the title from England's grasp.

    Evening Standard - Home

  • Referring to England's hapless Rugby World Cup, a campaign littered with off-field indiscretions, Barton said that footballers in a similar position would been "executed".

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • His work was collected by millionaires and royalty, and he was once dubbed England's

    The Guardian World News

  • From the 16th-century poet Robert Southwell, Sting chose the grim imagery of "The Burning Babe"; from Henry Purcell, whom Sting called "England's first pop star," he chose "The Cold Song," about an unwilling resurrection: "Let me freeze again to death!"

    NYT > Home Page

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