Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun Greek mythology Goddess of violent war, acting as a counterpart and companion to the war god Ares. Identified with Bellona in Roman mythology.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Ἐνυώ (Enuō).

Examples

  • OCZ calls the Enyo a "portable SSD" because that's exactly what it is.

    OCTools

  • It's hard to say why OCZ chose a name like "Enyo" for an SSD, but in Greek mythology (yes,

    OCTools

  • Enyo, the Goddess of War, plans to fulfill an ancient prophecy to destroy humanity by harnessing the dark power of the Summoning Stones of Egypt.

    New Releases: Fantasy, Paranormal Romance, Urban Fantasy & YA for the week of March 1, 2010

  • When the solstice flies finally came, Enyo brought all he could to her in her hut, and nursed her back himself.

    glimpse into the seeds of a maze

  • When the solstice flies finally came, Enyo brought all he could to her in her hut, and nursed her back himself.

    Archive 2008-06-01

  • Pemphredo well-clad, and saffron-robed Enyo, and the Gorgons who dwell beyond glorious Ocean in the frontier land towards Night where are the clear-voiced Hesperides, Sthenno, and Euryale, and

    Hesiod, Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

  • Enyo wasn't in sight, but the shift supervisor was busy sending handlers aloft.

    Ripping Time

  • Of course, after the miserable track record her four immediate predecessors had compiled between them, Enyo doubtless sweat bullets every time a gate opened, hoping she'd still have a job when it closed again.

    Ripping Time

  • Fear; [44] Enyo, the goddess of the war-cry; Keidomos, the demon of the noise of battles; and Eris (Contention), his twin-sister and companion, who always precedes his chariot when he rushes to the fight, the latter being evidently a simile of the poets to express the fact that war follows contention.

    Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

  • The Grææ, who acted as servants to their sisters the Gorgons, were also three in number; their names were Pephredo, Enyo, and Dino.

    Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

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