Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the island of Euboea.
  • n. An inhabitant of Euboea in central Greece.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Euboea +‎ -an

Examples

  • At least concerning medial positions, Bailey notes in Essays on time-based linguistic analysis (1996), p. 302, fn.4 (see link): "The [tšː] that one might expect in Attic comes from *tw (τϝ) as well as from *ky [cy]; this is found in Attic, Boeotian, Cretan, and some Euboean lects, while other lects (especially Ionic and Doric) had already moved on to σσ [šː]."

    Archive 2010-06-01

  • Euboean exiles and others of the same party, set upon them at

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • Boeotian exiles from Orchomenus, with some Locrians and Euboean exiles, and others who were of the same way of thinking, were defeated in battle, and some killed, others taken captive.

    The History of the Peloponnesian War

  • Then again, it seems that Carystus had skimped, compared to Paros, which paid Themistocles enough to deter an attack, so the Euboean city bears some blame for its misery.

    The Battle of Salamis

  • Having seen the signal, the fleet withdrew southward into the Euboean channel, all the way to the city of Chalcis.

    The Battle of Salamis

  • The huge side of the Euboean rock is hewn into a cavern, whither lead a hundred wide mouths, a hundred gateways, whence rush as many voices, the answers of the Sibyl.

    Selections from the _Aeneid_

  • Agis at Decelea agrees to support a Euboean uprising but delays action because …

    THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES

  • Thoucles founder of Euboean settlements on Sicily, 6.3.1-3

    THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES

  • Chalcis and Eretria, the two largest cities on Euboea, were major powers in the Archaic period, and Euboean coinage, weights, and measures were used throughout the Greek world.

    e. Central and Northern Greece

  • The two prominent standards of currency were the Euboean and the Aeginetan.

    3. The Archaic Period, 800-510 B.C.E

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