Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A stormy northeasterly wind mentioned in the Bible (Acts 27:14); any rough wind or storm.

Etymologies

From Hellenistic Ancient Greek εὐροκλύδων, from εὖρος ("east wind") + κλύδων ("wave"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • “In of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon,” says an old writer — of whose works I possess the only copy extant — “it maketh a marvellous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier.”

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • There is a wind called Euroclydon: it would be one of the Eumenides; only they are women.

    The Complete Project Gutenberg Writings of Charles Dudley Warner

  • [27: 14] But not long after a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon, rushed against it, [27: 15] and the ship being caught and not being able to bear up against the wind, we gave up, and were borne along.

    The New Testament Translated From the Original Greek, With Chronological Arrangement of the Sacred Books, and Improved Divisions of Chapters and Verses.

  • 'In judging of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon,' says an old writer -- of whose works I possess the only copy extant -- 'it maketh a marvellous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier.'

    Moby-Dick, or, The Whale

  • In judging of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon, "says an old writer -- of whose works I possess the only copy extant --" it maketh a marvellous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier. "

    Moby Dick: or, the White Whale

  • But not long after there arose against it a tempestuous wind, called Euroclydon.

    Probably Just One Of Those Funny Coincidences

  • It stood on a sharp bleak corner, where that tempestuous wind Euroclydon kept up

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Poor Lazarus there, chattering his teeth against the curbstone for his pillow, and shaking off his tatters with his shiverings, he might plug up both ears with rags, and put a corn-cob into his mouth, and yet that would not keep out the tempestuous Euroclydon.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Euroclydon, nevertheless, is a mighty pleasant zephyr to any one in-doors, with his feet on the hob quietly toasting for bed.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • A kind of aerial Euroclydon now smote my car, and three of the cords parted, which tilted my gondola to the side, filling me with terror.

    Sanders' Union Fourth Reader

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