Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A member of an ancient Italic people of southern Etruria.
  • n. The language of this people, closely related to Latin and known from place and personal names and from inscriptions.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Faliscans or their language or culture.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A member of an ancient Italic people who lived in southern Etruria
  • proper n. The language (related to Latin) of these people

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to Falerii, an ancient city of Etruria, or to its dialect, which was related to Latin.
  • n. A native or an inhabitant of Falerii.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

From Latin Faliscus, from Faleriī, a city of ancient Etruria.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin Faliscus +‎ -an.

Examples

  • Indeed, so successful was Latin that it supplanted all its ancient linguistic cousins—other Italic languages once spoken on the so-called Italic Peninsula: Faliscan, Oscan, Umbrian, and South Picene.

    The English Is Coming!

  • Read for example Pallottino, The Etruscans (1955), p.253 (see link) who testifies to the Faliscan inscription eco quto ... enotenosio ...

    A modification of Indo-Aegean, plus some new grammatical ideas on Minoan

  • Finally I tried to translate Faliscan, Oscan, the Novilara Stele and much more.

    What are Etruscans doing with those eggs?

  • These I-formulations are found in Faliscan, Latin and Greek languages as well and so one shouldn't assume that they're merely an Etruscan idiosyncracy.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • [2] The term 'I-formulation' refers to phrases in classical inscriptions consisting of "I am the [votive object] of [deceased recipient]", such as those using 1ps pronoun mi in Etruscan or those in Faliscan with 1ps pronoun eco.

    More on Etruscan-Rhaetic relationship

  • I realized that Faliscan, an Indo-European language of the Italic family to which Latin belongs, also shows an 'f' to 'h' sound change, so if there is anything to this, it would come down to something dialectal again.

    Archive 2007-06-01

  • Sure enough, I find this article called Is Faliscan a local Latin patois?

    The f to h sound change in Etruscan

  • This reinforces my belief that if there is an alternation, not a sound change, between 'f' and 'h' in Etruscan *names*, it is only present because of external influence due, say, to Faliscan and their naming conventions.

    The f to h sound change in Etruscan

  • Questionable as that might seem to newbies, there is an exact Faliscan equivalent of these types of Etruscan inscriptions eco quton Evotenosio "I am the vase of Evotenos" and we just need to accept that this linguistic analysis of mi as a 1ps pronoun is perfectly sound.

    Literacy among Etruscan specialists less than 10% (or Alphabet Chess)

  • I don't think there's a doubt that Umbrian, Faliscan and Roman practices were all related to Etruscan practices, despite differences of language.

    The Iguvine Tablets and Etruscan

Comments

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