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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The lowest grade was proudly occupied by me, Marcus Didius Falco, son of the utterly plebeian rogue Didius Favonius, heir to nothing and possessing only nobodies for ancestors.

    Excerpt: The Accusers by Lindsey Davis

  • Now we are talking of sepulchral inscriptions, I shall conclude this letter with the copy of a very singular will, made by Favonius

    Travels through France and Italy

  • Cato, they say, moved by the entreaties and the arguments of his friends, went unwillingly to take the oath, which he did the last of all, except only Favonius, one of his intimate acquaintance.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Cato was not present, for they had sent him seasonably out of the way into Cyprus; but Favonius, who was a zealous imitator of Cato, when he found he could do no good by opposing it, broke out of the house, and loudly declaimed against these proceedings to the people, but none gave him any hearing; some slighting him out of respect to Crassus and Pompey, and the greater part to gratify

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • There were with him the two Lentuli, and Favonius; and a little after they spied king Deiotarus, making up towards them from the shore; so they stayed and took him in along with them.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Domitius Aenobarbus, continually calling him Agamemnon, and king of kings, excited jealousy against him; and Favonius, by his unseasonable raillery, did him no less injury than those who openly attacked him, as when he cried out, “Good friends, you must not expect to gather any figs in Tusculum this year.”

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Favonius stood to be chosen aedile, and was like to lose it; but

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • But it was a hard matter to stop Favonius, wherever his wildness hurried him; for he was fierce in all his behavior, and ready to do anything to get his will.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Favonius, much the same to Cato as we are told Apollodorus, the

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • At the same time, Curio, the colleague of Favonius, gave very magnificent entertainments in another theater; but the people left his, and went to those of

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

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