Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A patronymic surname.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Rare spelling variant of Fitzhugh.

Examples

  • Fitchew looks on the ground, and gives his head a shake on one side as if he were mortified beyond measure.

    The Early Life of Mark Rutherford

  • The polecat survives as Fitch, Fitchett, and Fitchew --

    The Romance of Names

  • A man overtook her whom she recognised at once as Fitchew the jobbing gardener, porter, rough carpenter, creature of all work in Cowfold, one of the honestest souls in the place.

    Miriam's Schooling and Other Papers

  • Bible, of the evidence from prophecy, of the metaphysical necessity for an incarnation and atonement, he knew nothing, and it was a marvel to all respectable young persons how Fitchew, whose ignorance would disgrace a charity child, and who did not know that the world was round, or the date of the battle of Hastings, should set himself up against those who were so superior to him.

    Miriam's Schooling and Other Papers

  • "It's a good thing for you, Fitchew, that she is what she is."

    Miriam's Schooling and Other Papers

  • Fitchew always had one argument for those friends who strove to convert him.

    Miriam's Schooling and Other Papers

  • When Miriam parted from Fitchew she had still ten minutes 'walk.

    Miriam's Schooling and Other Papers

  • Fitchew, save that he was as independent as a baron, and, notwithstanding his poverty, cared little or nothing what people thought about him.

    Miriam's Schooling and Other Papers

  • Sunday-school one day to one of his classes, having Fitchew in his mind, "of a man who, if he was on a voyage in a ship commanded by a captain with a knowledge of navigation, should refuse in a storm to obey orders, affirming that they were all of no use, and should betake himself to his own little raft?"

    Miriam's Schooling and Other Papers

  • Fitchew was very rough and coarse, and rather grasping in his dealings with those who employed him, not so much because he was naturally mean, but because he was always determined that well-dressed folk should not

    Miriam's Schooling and Other Papers

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.