Definitions

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  • n. Alternative form of Freudianism.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • My first impression would be that it does, and therefore would be clearly affecting the way boys and men adress their effective sexuality in first person singular i.e. the I and the It or whatever, as I have mentioned Freud before - not that I'm particularly inclined to Freudism, much less as something universal, but seems very much appropiate here: in a circumcissed and circumcissing patriarchal ideological context.

    Circumcision and disease prevention

  • The hoax of Freudism;: A study of brainwashing the American professionals and laymen, by Ratibor-Ray M Jurjevich

    Clueless in America: Feeding the tapeworms of desire

  • Somewhere recently I saw an op-ed column about current trends in philosophy that said there were three great “isms” that came out of the 19th Century: Marxism, Freudism, and Darwinism.

    Here it comes...EuroScopes! - The Panda's Thumb

  • Freudism, no doubt, come close to the truth, but many of Freud's remoter deductions are far more scandalous than sound, and many of the professed Freudians, both

    Prejudices : first series,

  • Freudism teaches that the matter of yielding to or resisting temptation is one for which the individual is not wilfully responsible.

    Secret Societies And Subversive Movements

  • Freudism makes of the individual a machine, absolutely controlled by subconscious reflexes ....

    Secret Societies And Subversive Movements

  • By these who have studied Freudism this will, in a way, be understood.

    The Journal of Abnormal Psychology

  • I shall confine myself to the question of the application to stammering of the sexual theories so rampant in Freudism.

    The Journal of Abnormal Psychology

  • We could, if we so wished, have made generalized and wholesale attacks upon all that Freudism stood for regardless of whether, in certain principles, it was right or wrong.

    The Journal of Abnormal Psychology

  • The unconscious that introspectionists deny, (asserting that all phenomena ascribed to it are only plain neural mechanisms, and therefore outside the realm of psychology,) the feelings which introspection can confessedly never tell much about and concerning which our text-books in psychology still say so little: studies in these fields are marking a new epoch, and here the chief merit of Freudism is found.

    The Journal of Abnormal Psychology

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