Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The medical system based on the theories or practices of Galen.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The principles and practices of Galen.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The doctrines of Galen.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The medical system or principles of Galen.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • On the rise of Galenic theory in Islam and then in the Latin West, see Owsei Temkin, Galenism: Rise and Fall of a Medical Philosophy (Cornell, 1973), chaps. 2 and 3. back

    A Tender Age: Cultural Anxieties over the Child in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries

  • But Shakespeare was not in thrall to Galenism as was his son-in-law Hall: in other words, it was precisely his lack of university training that permitted him to be so acute an observer.

    On Shakespeare, Medicine, and Orwell - The Austrian Economists

  • But Shakespeare was not in thrall to Galenism as was his son-in-law: in other words, it was precisely his lack of university training that permitted him to be so acute an observer.

    Archive 2005-12-01

  • On the basis of it, Galenism foreshadowed a materialistic picture of man, even though the philosophical opinions of its founder remained eclectic and, on the particular prob - lem of the soul, loyal to Platonic and Aristotelian assertions of its substantial immateriality.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • The claim that this mystical science should replace the Aristotelianism and Galenism of the schools was looked on with dismay by early seventeenth-century mechanists who were forced to clarify their own views in their attacks on authors such as Paracelsus and Robert Fludd.

    Alchemy

  • The claim that this mystical science should replace the Aristotelianism and Galenism of the schools was looked on with dismay by early seventeenth - century mechanists who were forced to clarify their own views in their attacks on authors such as Paracelsus and Robert Fludd.

    ALCHEMY

  • Even in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Galenism held almost undisputed sway.

    Outlines of Greek and Roman Medicine

  • In so doing he destroyed the foundation of the whole teaching of Galenism and of the belief in its authority, and pointed out the way for the free investigation of nature.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 15: Tournely-Zwirner

  • His methods had been abandoned by his successors, and practice had in consequence suffered deterioration, but Cardan, studying under the revived Galenism, called into life by the teaching of Vesalius, went to deal with his cures under conditions more favourable than those offered by any previous period of the world's history.

    Jerome Cardan A Biographical Study

  • Galenism prevailed mostly in the south of Europe and France.

    Medical Essays, 1842-1882

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