Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A movement originating among the French Roman Catholic clergy that favored the restriction of papal control and the achievement by each nation of individual administrative autonomy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. The principles or actions of those, within the Roman Catholic Church in France, who (especially in 1682) sought to restrict the papal authority in that country and increase the power of the national church.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The principles, tendencies, or action of those, within the Roman Catholic Church in France, who (esp. in 1682) sought to restrict the papal authority in that country and increase the power of the national church.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The spirit of nationalism within the French church, as opposed to the absolutism of the papal see.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a religious movement originating among the French Roman Catholic clergy that favored the restriction of papal control and the achievement by each nation of individual administrative autonomy of the church

Etymologies

Gallican +‎ -ism (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The attempt as made in France is known as Gallicanism, as made in Germany it is termed Febronianism and Josephism, in Italy Leopoldism.

    Archive 2007-10-14

  • At a time when the error since called Gallicanism spread everywhere he was a

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 13: Revelation-Stock

  • Febronianism was an attempted revival of the conciliar movement of the fifteenth century and closely resembled "Gallicanism," as the movement in favor of the "Liberties of the Gallican Church" was called.

    A Political and Social History of Modern Europe V.1.

  • This then was the doleful end of the intellectual progress of the century of "enlightenment" Gallicanism and Jansenism, Febronianism and Josephism, still concealing their hostility to the Papacy with fine-sounding words, had gnawed at the Church's vitals from within, while the spirit of the Encyclopedists and " philosophers " threatened it from without.

    Archive 2009-05-01

  • Gallicanism opened the way for the overt paganism of the reign of Louis XV, manifested in art, in literature and in lifestyles.

    La Mystérieuse prophétie

  • But we can't let modernism go against our traditions, and I am sorry if it seems some not all or even a majority of SSPXers are waltzing close to Donatism or a denial of the anti-Gallicanism that culminated in Vatican I.

    Motu Proprio "Ecclesiae Unitatem" - in English

  • France's love affair with Gallicanism and Modernism makes our current situation look rosy...none of us have had to decide whether Government sponsored Priests offer an actually valid Mass or not you can despise the NO all you want, but you have no reason or warrant to not think Christ is present on the altar, not any true worries like the Frenchmen did right after the revolution.

    Motu Proprio "Ecclesiae Unitatem" - in English

  • In FRANCE, the Churchs battle with Jansenism and Gallicanism and the preoccupation of theologians with the Grace problems, gave rationalism time to sens its roots deep down into soil already prepared by loose morality.

    Forerunners of the French Revolution. Part 3a

  • Gallicanism might be described in a general way as a movement which tried to nationalise the Church in France and to make it independent of the Holy See.

    Archive 2007-10-14

  • I can't speak for all of it, naturally, but the chapter on the Church holds up very well -- it does a good job showing just how messed up the Catholic Church in France was in the 17th century, given the disputes raging at the time over Jansenism, Gallicanism, and Quietism.

    Archive 2005-08-01

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