Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A male given name, common in the Middle Ages but rare today.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Name of an early saint, Latin Gervasius, of unknown meaning, possibly Latinized from some Germanic name.

Examples

  • "Gervase," I said, "suggests that you should distribute some of your money now, toer ... reduce the estate tax."

    Hot Money

  • # -- "In the year of grace one thousand one hundred and seventy-four, by the just but occult judgment of God, the Church of Christ at Canterbury was consumed by fire, in the forty-fourth year from its dedication, that glorious choir, to wit, which had been so magnificently completed by the care and industry of Prior Conrad" ( "Gervase," translated by Willis).

    The Cathedral Church of Canterbury [2nd ed.].

  • "Gervase," she said, "if your little child had lived --" I broke in upon her, losing all self-control in a wild, sudden passion of uncontrollable weeping.

    The Woman Who Saved Me

  • "Gervase," she said softly, "you think you do not love your husband."

    The Woman Who Saved Me

  • "Gervase," she said, "if your little child had lived --" I broke in upon her, losing all self-control in a wild, sudden passion of uncontrollable weeping.

    The Woman Who Saved Me

  • "Gervase," she said softly, "you think you do not love your husband."

    The Woman Who Saved Me

  • Gosh, it's over a year since I read The Moving Toyshop; here Gervase Fen is embroiled in a mystery of murder and espionage in a West Country cathedral town in about 1940.

    January Books 27) Holy Disorders, by Edmund Crispin

  • Expect to find signed works by the shop's regular customer Alan Bennett and local authors such as Gervase Phinn on the ground floor, with the basement given over to classical, folk and jazz CDs and a wide range of sheet music.

    Independent bookshops in north-east England

  • For those already familiar with the homestyle recipes and household tips that Gervase Markham provided in his 1615-published "The Well-Kept Kitchen," discovering these snazzy keepers is like reuniting with long-lost friends.

    News You Can Eat

  • Gervase Phinn may not know his sheep, but he does know his children, and their portraits are always immensely appealing.

    More Bookish Comedy « Tales from the Reading Room

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