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Examples

  • England; and the Great Charter was the issue of his work.

    The Rise of the Democracy

  • Henry found himself obliged to respect the Great Charter, however much he hated it, and to make laws similar to the laws of the Great Earl of Leicester, and to be moderate and forgiving towards the people at last — even towards the people of London, who had so long opposed him.

    A Child's History of England

  • He had no love for the Great Charter — few Kings had, through many, many years — but he had high qualities.

    A Child's History of England

  • It simply reaffirmed the ancient rights and privileges of the English people as defined in the Great Charter and by the good laws of Edward I. and Edward III.

    General History for Colleges and High Schools

  • English thought a king was doing them a wrong they reminded him of the promises made by King John in the Great Charter and demanded that the promises be solemnly renewed.

    Introductory American History

  • The work done at this Parliament of Oxford was an attempt to make the King abide loyally by the Great Charter; and the Provisions of Oxford, as they were called, set up a standing council of fifteen, by whom the King was to be guided, and ordered that Parliament was to meet three times a year: at

    The Rise of the Democracy

  • With some reluctance the barons granted the delay, and ultimately, in 1215, the tyrant bowed to the inevitable, called the barons to a conference at Runnymede, and there signed the Great Charter, whose most important clauses protect the personal liberty and property of every freeman in the kingdom by giving security from arbitrary imprisonment and unjust exactions.

    Christmas: Its Origin and Associations Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries

  • The Catholic church found England a nation of barbarians and brought it up, step by step, until Catholic barons wrung from King John at Runnymede the Great Charter -- the mother of the American Constitution.

    The Complete Works of Brann the Iconoclast, Volume 12

  • In the Great Charter, as has been stated, it was stipulated that in the assessment of scutages and of all save the three commonly recognized feudal aids the king should seek the advice of the General Council.

    The Governments of Europe

  • A curious effect is presented by the tomb of Stephen Langton, who was archbishop from 1207 to 1228, and is famous as having compelled King John to sign the Great Charter, and also as having divided the Bible into chapters.

    The Cathedral Church of Canterbury [2nd ed.].

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