Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A Russian. Used formerly in distinguishing ethnic Russians from other constituent peoples of the Soviet Union or the Russian Empire.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun obsolete the Russian language, when considered to be mutually intelligible with the Ukrainian ("Little Russian") and Belarusian ("White Russian") languages.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a member of the chief stock of Russian people living in European Russia; used to distinguish ethnic Russians from other peoples incorporated into Russia

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Translation of Russian Velikorusskiĭ : velikiĭ, great + russkiĭ, Russian.]

Examples

  • Empire (sometimes called Great Russian), bearing about the same relation to it as Lowland Scotch does to English, or Plattdeutsch to

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • Indeed, after the August coup, anxiety in many republics had come to focus on the prospect of Great Russian revanchism.

    The Return

  • Indeed, after the August coup, anxiety in many republics had come to focus on the prospect of Great Russian revanchism.

    The Return

  • Indeed, after the August coup, anxiety in many republics had come to focus on the prospect of Great Russian revanchism.

    The Return

  • Indeed, after the August coup, anxiety in many republics had come to focus on the prospect of Great Russian revanchism.

    The Return

  • It all happened so swiftly -- and the bitterness over Moscow's default is still so raw -- that the lessons of the Great Russian collapse have only begun to set in.

    A Black Hole

  • Or is Mr. Wilson a pure Muscovite and a Great Russian imperialist?

    Other Comment

  • As might naturally be expected, most Malo-Russian authors of eminence, have preferred using the Great Russian, notably Gogol, who however is very fond of introducing provincial expressions which require a glossary.

    Russia As Seen and Described by Famous Writers

  • Nearly every Ruthenian author in the empire has written his chief works in Great Russian, because denied the use of his own language.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • Their language differs but slightly from Great Russian, inclining towards Polish and

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

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