Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • A historical region and former province of southwest France. Part of England after the marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine to Henry II in 1152, it was reconquered by France in 1453.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. Aquitaine.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I am told by Lord Montgomery, who knew him in Guienne, that a nobler spirit does not exist.

    The Scottish Chiefs

  • My father and myself were then in Guienne; Edward persuaded him that you affected the crown; and he returned with that deceiver to draw his sword against his people and their ambitious idol – for so he believed you to be; and grievous has been the expiation of that fatal hour!

    The Scottish Chiefs

  • De Valence threw out hints respecting a frontier town in Guienne, which, he said, he thought his royal master could be persuaded to yield to the French monarch, as naturally belonging to Gascony.

    The Scottish Chiefs

  • He told Wallace that he had met the two sons of the late Lord Badenoch in Guienne; that James, who now pretended such resentment of his father's death, had ever been a rebellious son.

    The Scottish Chiefs

  • In [3148] Perigord in France the air is subtle, healthful, seldom any plague or contagious disease, but hilly and barren: the men sound, nimble, and lusty; but in some parts of Guienne, full of moors and marshes, the people dull, heavy, and subject to many infirmities.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Narbonne covetous, they of Guienne coiners, they of Provence atheists, they of Rheims superstitious, they of Lyons treacherous, of Normandy proud, of Picardy insolent, &c. We may generally conclude, the greater men, the more vicious.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Monsieur de Manerville, the father, was a worthy Norman gentleman, well known to the Marechael de Richelieu, who married him to one of the richest heiresses of Bordeaux in the days when the old duke reigned in Guienne as governor.

    A Marriage Contract

  • Moreover, not willing to dip into his Guienne property, he had not that bold extravagance which leads to great strokes and calls attention at any cost to the proceedings of a young man.

    A Marriage Contract

  • The kings of England, being themselves great vassals of France for Normandy, and afterwards for Guienne and other provinces, easily adopted the usages of the kings from whom they held.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • The inhabitants of the coasts of France were always good seamen; the people of Guienne always compose the best infantry;

    A Philosophical Dictionary

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