Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Relating to, or discovered by, Clopton Havers, 17th-century English physician.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Havers +‎ -ian

Examples

  • Cross sections of therapsid bones reveal a series of small holes called Haversian canals, which are typical of fast-growing, warm-blooded animals and which are absent in cold-blooded reptiles, indicating that the therapsids developed a progressively more mammalian warm-blooded metabolism as time went on.

    What a difference a day makes. - The Panda's Thumb

  • Two kinds of small channels are found running through it in different directions, known as the Haversian canals and the canaliculi (Fig. 94).

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • These districts are termed Haversian systems; the central hole is an Haversian canal, and the rings are layers of bony tissue arranged concentrically around the central canal, and termed lamellæ.

    II. Osteology. 2. Bone

  • She was fascinated by it, the human body like a vast and foreign landscape with its intercoastal veins, Haversian Canal and Capsule of Tenon.

    The Life You Longed For

  • They pass out from the Haversian canals at right angles, going to all portions of the compact substance except a thin layer at the surface.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • * — Surrounding the Haversian canals are thin layers of bone substance called the _laminæ_, and within these are great numbers of irregular bodies, known as the _lacunæ_.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • The _Haversian canals_ are larger than the canaliculi and contain small nerves and blood vessels, chiefly capillaries

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • Lymph from these vessels is conveyed to the cells through the canaliculi that connect with the Haversian canals.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • In addition to this the articular surfaces are quite smooth and dense, having no Haversian canals, and they are covered with a layer of cartilage.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • The cells within the interior of the bone receive their nourishment from the small blood vessels in the Haversian canals.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

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