Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A scholar who specializes in the study of Hebrew.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A scholar who specializes in the study of the Hebrew language

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One versed in the Hebrew language and learning.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One versed in the Hebrew language and learning.
  • n. One imbued with the Hebraic spirit. See Hebraism, 2.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. linguist specializing in the Hebrew language

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Hebr[a]- + -ist

Examples

  • Milton, for instance, despite being a "serious Hebraist" in his reading of, and about, the Old Testament, had harsh attitudes toward actual Jews.

    Oh, to Be In England

  • His interest in the movement may have attracted the attention of the noted Christian Hebraist Johann Christoph Wagenseil (1633 – 1705), Professor of Hebraica at the Lutheran University at Altdorf, who employed Jews and converts as translators and informants in his Hebraist enterprise.

    Bella Perlhefter.

  • One of the unsung heroes of the Hebraist movement in the United States, Anna Sherman for forty years taught Hebrew — and used language instruction to inculcate Jewish identity — at the extension schools of the Jewish Theological Seminary Teachers Institute.

    Anna G. Sherman.

  • Anna G. Sherman was one of the unsung heroes of the Hebraist movement in the United States.

    Anna G. Sherman.

  • Her father, Anshel Fogel, who died in the 1930s, was a Hebraist, the director of the Baron de Hirsch school in Burshtyn and later of the Lwów (Lemberg) Jewish orphanage.

    Dvoyre Fogel.

  • Her father, Leib, an educator and Hebraist, “imbued her with a deep attachment to Jewish life and learning,” teaching both Shulamite and her sister, Judith, “respect for the thinking life.”

    Israeli Folk Dance Pioneers in North America.

  • Nina Salaman was a well-regarded Hebraist, known especially for her translations of medieval Hebrew poetry, at a time when Jewish scholarship in Europe was a male preserve.

    Nina Ruth Davis Salaman.

  • Her hasidic great-great grandfather, Rabbi Phinehas ben Abraham Abba Shapiro Korets (1726 – 1791), would no doubt have disapproved of Shapiro, who became an accomplished and prolific female Hebraist.

    Havvah Shapiro.

  • Havvah Shapiro entered the "Garden of Eden" — the world of Hebrew learning and literature — under the tutelage of her parents and went on to become a prolific female Hebraist, with over fifty published articles to her credit.

    Havvah Shapiro.

  • Liege, a learned Jesuit, profound theologian, and accomplished historian, was famous as a Hebraist and lecturer on Holy Writ.

    The Land of Midian

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.