Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Alternative form of Hebridean.
  • n. Alternative form of Hebridean.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Soon after I was told by a gentleman, who is generally acknowledged the greatest master of Hebridian antiquities, that there had indeed once been both Bards and Senachies; and that

    A Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland

  • The Lord Chancellor [Thurlow] told me he had read every word of my Hebridian Journal; 'he could not help it; adding,' could you give a rule how to write a book that a man must read?

    Life Of Johnson

  • Soon after I was told by a gentleman, who is generally acknowledged the greatest master of Hebridian antiquities, that there had, indeed, once been both bards and senachies; and that senachi signified the man of talk, or of conversation; but that neither bard nor senachi had existed for some centuries. '

    Life of Johnson

  • Soon after I was told by a gentleman, who is generally acknowledged the greatest master of Hebridian antiquities, that there had indeed once been both Bards and Senachies; and that Senachi signified 'the man of talk,' or of conversation; but that neither Bard nor Senachi had existed for some centuries.

    Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland

  • The security guard asked to open her bag, though since when Al Qaida have been recruiting elderly Hebridian Presbyterian ladies might be a question that ocurred.

    The Guardian World News

  • Banker abandons Hebridian exile after success in quitting smoking Car leasing

    Top stories from Times Online

  • King Haco accordingly sent Sigurd the Hebridian, with some fast-sailing vessels, to examine on what terms the Irish invited him thither.

    The Norwegian account of Haco's expedition against Scotland, A.D. MCCLXIII.

  • He also ordered five ships for Bute; these were under the command of Erlend Red, Andrew Nicolson, Simon Stutt, Ivar Ungi Eyfari, and Gutthorm the Hebridian, each in his own ship.

    The Norwegian account of Haco's expedition against Scotland, A.D. MCCLXIII.

  • The Hebridian Princes considered this involuntary homage, as, at least, implying protection: and, when that was not afforded, they thought themselves justified in forming new connexions more conducive to their safety.

    The Norwegian account of Haco's expedition against Scotland, A.D. MCCLXIII.

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