Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The name Hermas also appears for Hermaeus (Hermaios), a priest mentioned in the Roman Martyrology and in the Greek Menaea as companion of Bishop Nicander of Myra in

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Sirona to call Hermas to her window; she felt so unhappy and lonely, that any one must have seemed welcome from whom she might look for a friendly and encouraging word to revive her deeply wounded self-respect.

    Homo Sum — Volume 02

  • Sirona to call Hermas to her window; she felt so unhappy and lonely, that any one must have seemed welcome from whom she might look for a friendly and encouraging word to revive her deeply wounded self-respect.

    Homo Sum — Complete

  • Sirona to call Hermas to her window; she felt so unhappy and lonely, that any one must have seemed welcome from whom she might look for a friendly and encouraging word to revive her deeply wounded self-respect.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Georg Ebers Works

  • Hermas, that is, about 135.] [Footnote 188: See the fragment in Euseb.

    History of Dogma, Volume 1 (of 7)

  • (For example, you could put out a volume containing the Didache, Epistle of Barnabas, and the Shepherd of Hermas, with essays on why they weren't included in the Biblical canon, what it tells us about the early Church, maps, historical information, and so on ...)

    New books due out this fall from Ignatius Press

  • The ascetical message also resonated well with Hellenistic ideas about the "sober life" of the wise man or woman sophrosyne, and much of late first and second century Christian literature, such as the Didache, the Clementine Letters or the Shepherd of Hermas, began to stress the need for this wise lifestyle kind of sobriety as a fundamental character of general Christian discipleship.

    Norris J. Chumley, Ph.D.: The Compelling Spiritual Discipline Of Asceticism

  • The ascetical message also resonated well with Hellenistic ideas about the "sober life" of the wise man or woman sophrosyne, and much of late first and second century Christian literature, such as the Didache, the Clementine Letters or the Shepherd of Hermas, began to stress the need for this wise lifestyle kind of sobriety as a fundamental character of general Christian discipleship.

    Norris J. Chumley, Ph.D.: The Compelling Spiritual Discipline Of Asceticism

  • A remarkably insightful description of the classic “tug of war” between the higher and lower nature in each of us is found in the second-century Christian book The Shepherd of Hermas.

    HOW EVIL WORKS

  • Though not part of the canon of the Holy Bible, Hermas was widely revered by the early Christians, praised by church leaders like St. Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, and Origen, and was frequently read publicly in early churches to edify the faithful.

    HOW EVIL WORKS

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