Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A taxonomic genus within the subfamily Herpestinae — the mongooses.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

New Latin, from Ancient Greek ἑρπηστής (herpestés, "creeping").

Examples

  • Introduced pig Sus scrofa, cats, mongoose Herpestes auropunctatus, dogs, birds, and a very large number of invertebrates including Argentine ant Iridomyrmex humilis, have colonized parts of the park environment.

    Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, United States

  • Common are the mongoose (Herpestes officinarum), agouti (Dasyprocta antillensis), opposum (Didelphis marsupialis), pig (Sus scrofa), and domestic cat and dog.

    Grenada

  • Mammalian introductions have occurred periodically in this region and include species such as agouti (Dasyprocta agouti), fallow deer (Dama dama) to provide game, the indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus) and the inadvertent importation of rats (Rattus rattus, R. norvegicus).

    Guadeloupe

  • Other notable mammals include carnivores, such as leopard Panthera pardus, wild dog or dhole Cuon alpinus (VU), leopard cat Felis bengalensis, fishing cat F. viverrina (LR), Javan mongoose Herpestes javanicus and several civets, including binturong Arctictis binturong.

    Ujung Kulon National Park and Krakatau Nature Reserve, Indonesia

  • Some of these species, including the Indian grey mongoose (Herpestes edwardsi), Javan mongoose (H. javanicus) and Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica) were introduced for the purposes of snake control but have instead caused significant declines of many native birds and small mammals.

    Biological diversity in Japan

  • The Jamaican iguana declined dramatically during the beginning of the 19th century due to the introduction of the Indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus) and predation by introduced dogs as well as habitat destruction.

    Jamaican dry forests

  • Commonly introduced mammals in this ecoregion are the mongoose (Herpestes officinarum), agouti (Dasyprocta antillensis), opposum (Didelphis marsupialis), pig (Sus scrofa), and domestic cat and dog.

    Windward Islands moist forests

  • More common are species such as agouti (Dasyprocta agouti), fallow deer (Dama dama) to provide game, the indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus) and the inadvertent importation of the black or roof rat and the brown or Norway rat (Rattus rattus, R. norvegicus).

    Leeward Islands dry forests

  • Marsh (Atilax paludinosus) and large grey mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon), as well as the spotted-necked (Lutra maculicollis) and Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) inhabit the river courses and valleys of the ecoregion, although the Cape clawless otter often wanders far from permanent waters in search of new feeding grounds.

    Maputaland-Pondoland bushland and thickets

  • The small Asian mongoose (Herpestes javanicus), which was first introduced in 1872 to control rodents and poisonous snakes, has devastated native populations of reptiles and amphibians and led to the extinction of dozens of species.

    Biological diversity in the Caribbean Islands

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.