Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Bible The first six books of the Old Testament.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. The first six books of the Old Testament in the Bible.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The first six books of the Old Testament.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The first six books of the Old Testament.

Etymologies

hexa- + (Penta)teuch.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Compare Pentateuch. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The name Hexateuch, in the intention of the critics, does not mean that the sources of these books are to be found only in the six books herein included.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • If the Book of Joshua was, as we have assumed, originally connected with the first five books, constituting what is now called the Hexateuch, if these six books were put into their present form by the same writers, we should expect that the Mosaic legislation would be clearly traced through all these books.

    Who Wrote the Bible? : a Book for the People

  • Review: "" The critical analysis of the Hexateuch is the result of more than a century of profound study of the documents by the greatest critics of the age.

    Who Wrote the Bible? : a Book for the People

  • University professors of deservedly high repute accept the critical decision that the Hexateuch is a compilation, in which the share of

    Collected Essays, Volume V Science and Christian Tradition: Essays

  • University professors of deservedly high repute accept the critical decision that the Hexateuch is a compilation, in which the share of Moses, either as author or as editor, is not quite so clearly demonstrable as it might be; highly placed Divines tell us that the pre-Abrahamic Scripture narratives may be ignored; that the book of Daniel may be regarded as a patriotic romance of the second century B.C.; that the words of the writer of the fourth Gospel are not always to be distinguished from those which he puts into the mouth of Jesus.

    Lectures and Essays

  • Non-Catholics have almost all followed the critics in the question of the "Hexateuch"; even the conservative Hastings, "Dict. of the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • _Introduction to the Literature of the Old Testament_, where every section throughout the Hexateuch is referred to its special documentary source.

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • In the book of Samuel, even more distinctly than in the Hexateuch, composite authorship is apparent.

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • Jehovist and Elohist of the Hexateuch; but considering the fact that the older notices in i. -ii. 5, on account of the prominence of Judah and for other reasons, are usually assigned to J, and that some of the characteristics of these two documents recur in the course of the book, the hypothesis that J and E are continued at least into

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • Further, it is important to note that, just as in the prophetic portions of the Hexateuch, duplicates are often present -- very probably in the stories of Ehud, iii. 12ff.,

    Introduction to the Old Testament

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