Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A member of an ancient people living in Anatolia and northern Syria about 2000-1200 B.C.
  • n. The Indo-European language of the Hittites.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Hittites, their language, or their culture.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A person of the Hittite Kingdom, a Bronze Age kingdom of Anatolia.
  • proper n. An ancient Indo-European language of the Anatolian branch, attested from the 16th century BC until the 13th century BC.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Hittite people.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Hittite language.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Hittite Kingdom, located in central Anatolia (modern Turkey), that flourished from about 1800 to 1400 BCE.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A member of an ancient people (or perhaps group of peoples) whose settlements extended from Armenia westward into Asia Minor and southward into Palestine. They are known to have been met along the Orontes as early as 1500 b. c., and were often at war with the Egyptians and Assyrians. Especially in the north they developed a considerable civilization, of which numerous monuments and inscriptions are extant. Authorities are not agreed as to their race. While several attempts have been made to decipher the Hittite characters, little progress has yet been made.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One of a powerful ancient people, probably not Semitic, of northern Syria and parts of Asia Minor.
  • Of or pertaining to the Hittites.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or relating to the Hittite people or their language or culture
  • n. a member of an ancient people who inhabited Anatolia and northern Syria about 2000 to 1200 BC
  • n. the language of the Hittites and the principal language of the Anatolian group of languages; deciphered from cuneiform inscriptions

Etymologies

From Hebrew ḥittî, from Akkadian ḫatti, from Hittite Hatti, land of the Hattians (indigenous inhabitants of Anatolia), of Proto-Hattic (language of the Hattians) origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Coined erroneously in the early 20th century in confusion with the neighbouring Hattites (Hattic) whose language was recorded in discovered texts as hasili. It is now known that the Hittites called themselves nesili ("pertaining to the city of Nesa"), hence the less popular alternative name Nesite or Neshite. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "The Hittite" is made their "mother"; alluding to Esau's wives, daughters of Heth, whose ways vexed Rebekah

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • Given that Abraham comes from Ur of the Chaldeas, stops off in Hittite Haran, and then travels down into Canaan, given that the nomadic tribes referred to in contemporary sources as the Habiru or Khabiru who poured down into this region around the time Abraham is said to be arriving (causing the coastal city states no end of grief with their continual raids) were a mix of Hittite and Semitic peoples, given that the Bible portrays Heth (the eponymous tribal forefather) as a son of Canaan, and has the whole region chock-full of Hittites -- it's little wonder that the cultures of the Hittites and the early Hebrews share certain features.

    Archive 2006-02-01

  • I encountered that objection once when discussing it online and I didn't know what to say about that until I encountered this informative article entitled Hittite hi-verbs from adverbs that eliminates that argument.

    The origin of Indo-European ego

  • So Troy became what the Hittites called a “soldier servant,” that is, a Hittite vassal state with military responsibilities, with a promise of Hittite military protection in return.

    The Trojan War

  • And his sons Isaac and Ish'ma-el buried him in the cave of Machpe'lah, in the field of Ephron the son of Zohar the Hittite, which is before Mamre; the field which Abraham purchased of the sons of Heth: Gen. 23. 3-16 there was Abraham buried, and Sarah his wife.

    Genesis 25.

  • And his sons Isaac and Ishmael buried him in the cave of Machpelah, in the field of Ephron the son of Zohar the Hittite, which is before

    Commentary on Genesis - Volume 2

  • The dragon recalls the Hittite slaying of the dragon in the Puruli festival.

    MYTH IN BIBLICAL TIMES

  • Ishmael buried him in the cave of Machpelah, in the field of Ephron ben Zohar the Hittite, which is before Mamre; the field which Abraham purchased of the sons of Heth; there was Abraham buried and Sarah his wife.

    Prolegomena

  • For we read in the following verse: 'And his sons Isaac and Ishmael buried him in the cave of Machpelah, in the field of Ephron, the son of Zohar the Hittite, which is before

    Expositions of Holy Scripture

  • And his sons Isaac and Ishmael buried him in the cave of Machpelah, in the field of Ephron the son of Zohar the Hittite, which is before Mamre;

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

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