Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who accepts the doctrines of Thomas Hobbes.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • _Leviathan_, brought him into very bad odour, not merely on political grounds (which, so long as the Commonwealth lasted, would not have been surprising), but for religious reasons; and during the last years of his life, and for long afterwards, "Hobbist" was, certainly with very little warrant from his writings, used as a kind of polite equivalent for atheist.

    A History of Elizabethan Literature

  • But if a Hobbist be asked why? he will answer: — Because the public requires it, and the

    An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

  • Treatise, has no clear sceptical implications (i.e., along Hobbist lines).

    Hume on Religion

  • Ethics (1677) was also identified as containing Hobbist doctrines (e.g., materialism and necessitarianism) that led directly to atheism.

    Hume on Religion

  • Given these points of resemblance, Hobbes's critics in England were quick to link the names of Hobbes and Spinoza and they viewed “Spinozism” as simply a variant of the prevalent disease of “Hobbist atheism”.

    Hume on Religion

  • But if a Hobbist be asked why? he will answer: - Because the public requires it, and the Leviathan will punish you if you do not.

    God, Aids & Circumcision

  • Providence (or whatever as a Hobbist he put in place of Providence), had, in pointing him the fortune, pointed also to Patricia Verney.

    Prisoners of Hope A Tale of Colonial Virginia

  • Roman Catholic in Paris, or perhaps rather a Roman Catholic Hobbist.

    The Life of John Milton Volume 3 1643-1649

  • Roman Catholic Hobbist and freethinker, had then flashed out in the speech of the distressed envoy.

    The Life of John Milton Volume 3 1643-1649

  • But the prejudice sprang from a true sense of the effect which the Hobbist philosophy must necessarily have whether on the current religion or on the current notions of political and social morality.

    History of the English People, Volume VI (of 8) Puritan England, 1642-1660; The Revolution, 1660-1683

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